CFP: LATINX LIFE IN THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC for Latinx Talk

CFP: LATINX LIFE IN THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

The effects of the health crisis are being felt unevenly by a variety of communities and nations across the world. We, at Latinx Talk, are eager for you to share how you and your networks are experiencing these events. How has the pandemic changed your daily life? How has the pandemic impacted you personally, emotionally, and culturally? How has it affected undocumented and mixed-status families and communities? What have been some of the highlights of generosity, empathy, and compassion you have witnessed or heard? And, in turn, what have been some of the low points as we struggle collectively to make sense of the calamity? Finally, what are the creative coping mechanisms you and others have developed to survive and thrive in the pandemic?

We invite a variety of submissions, including:

  • discussions of past and current research in all disciplines as it relates to the current pandemic and its impact on Latinx communities
  • first-person narratives of living with and through the pandemic
  • essays that describe and discuss community resources and tool kits that might be good models for other cities or regions
  • reflections on how the pandemic has influenced or affected your teaching, especially in Chicanx and Latinx Studies
  • examinations of relevant policy and politics resources that are available particularly for Latinx communities

CFP: LATINX YOUTH DISCUSS LIFE IN THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

We invite essays from students in junior high or high school on living and learning in the COVID-19 pandemic. Some questions that might be considered include:

  • How have you experienced the pandemic?
  • How have you adjusted to learning online?
  • What are the ups and downs?
  • How has the pandemic impacted your understanding of the world we live in and your hopes for the future?

We will begin peer reviewing submissions in early May, but will accept submissions until May 31, 2020, for publication in June and July 2020. Please direct any questions about either submission to latinxtalk@gmail.com

Food in the time of COVID-19: Call for Submissions

Any good COVID-19 stories out there? If so, share them with Gastronomica: The Journal for Food Studies.

Lockdowns, social distancing, quarantines, and simple fear in a time of uncertainty highlight the challenges of provisioning, the experiences of food workers, and the essential services food shops, hawkers, street vendors, bars, restaurants, markets, farms, and many more play in providing not only sustenance but also the liveliness upon which we depend in daily life.

The Gastronomica Editorial Collective is seeking dispatches about food in the time of COVID-19. We seek as many diverse voices as possible, from as many affected, infected places as possible to provide a snapshot in time. We know that even as this next issue will go to press, the situation in many places may have worsened (but, hopefully, improved). We are, though, already immersed in stories and narratives of resilience that deserve to be remembered and documented. We seek, therefore, reflections in resilience. How do people feed themselves in times of crisis? What is the role of community and social ties in feeding ourselves, families, the ill, and each other? How has the crisis both highlighted the essential services provided by food workers and the precarity of those services?

We invite shorter pieces (100-1000 words) in the form of personal dispatches drawn from lived experience: portraits, creative non-fiction, telephonic/digital interviews, photographs and other images, and more. If you are, or you know, someone who would like their voice heard, but might not have the time to put words to paper, please be in touch and we can arrange a conversation or interview with a collective member. We are eager to read, listen, and share.

Submissions can be sent directly to gastrome@ucpress.edu with the subject line “Food & Covid,” followed by your name and submission title. Please include a brief cover letter that can function as both an abstract and author bio, and include a word count. (If you have any citations, they should follow our general submission guidelines at https://gcfs.ucpress.edu/content/submit.) Please include (in-text) the date, place, and if possible, time, of writing in all submissions.

In an effort to document, recall, and portray particular moments in the coming months, we are offering rolling submission deadlines.

First submissions by: 10 April 

Second submissions by: 25 April

(We anticipate running more dispatches in forthcoming issues.)

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – (UN)NATURAL DISASTERS: SITES OF RESISTANCE

For many Latinx communities, the contemporary period can best be described as disastrous:  natural disasters like Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico in 2017, followed by the equally disastrous federal response; the sustained crisis at the US southern border, created through a series of cruel, inhumane, extra-legal, and illegal policies; ICE raids at workplaces that force children to come home from their first day of school to find their parents gone; indefinite separation and detention of children and families; US response to the crisis in Venezuela; detention of US citizens for suspicion of being undocumented; mass deportation with no promise of due process. All of these (and more) suggest that this moment is marked by disaster, as Latinx communities are under siege in ways unprecedented in contemporary America.

This special issue of Label Me Latina/o invites submissions that consider these moments of disaster and crisis, as well as the ways that communities, writers, scholars, and activists resist them. As scholars of Latinx Literature, we know that the current moments of disaster are part of a larger cultural failure to understand the history and role of Latinxs in the United States. While we have long called attention to legacies of state violence, including conquest, colonization, and imperialism, we nonetheless live in a moment in which such legacies are obscured by nationalist fantasies which erase historic Latinx presence in the US, in favor of a rhetoric of invasion and othering.

In response to this, we invite critical and creative manuscripts that consider this moment of (Un)natural Disaster and our resistance to it in light of the following (though this is certainly not limited to these):

 

  • Border representations
  • Ecological/Environmental disasters
  • Environmental critiques
  • Colonial legacies and their accompanying disasters
  • Imperialism and its disasters
  • Migration and immigration as response to disaster
  • Representations of deportation
  • Representations of detention
  • Civil unrest and protest movements
  • Mourning and memory work
  • Historical novels and re-imaginings
  • Historical repetitions (the use of sites of Indigenous subjugation and of Japanese internment (such as Fort Sill) as current detention centers)
  • Representations of slavery
  • Representations of genocide

While we welcome scholarly and creative work that responds to literary texts, we also understand representation broadly, and encourage work that also looks at representations in popular culture, and media, as well as work that reflects on or contextualizes creative work and performances that are sites of resistance (such as poetry readings, performance art, protest art).   Of particular interest is intersectional work that seeks to contextualize this current moment in light of larger histories of disaster and resistance. In short, while this moment is one in which our communities are under siege on various fronts, Latinx communities have a long history of confronting, resisting and reshaping moments of disaster, and this special edition seeks to highlight that history, as well as provide a space to respond to this particular moment.

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. Label Me Latina/o also publishes creative literary pieces whose authors self-define as Latina, Latino or Latinx regardless of thematic content. Interviews of Latino, Latina or Latinx authors will also be considered. The Co-Directors will publish creative works and interviews in English, Spanish or Spanglish whereas analytical essays should be written in English or Spanish.

Scholarly submissions should be between 12-30 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font and should follow the MLA Style Manual. Please use End Notes rather than Footnotes and place page numbers in the upper right hand corner. Original, unpublished submissions in Microsoft Word (PC compatible format) should be sent electronically to Visiting Editor Lorna Pérez at perezll@buffalostate.edu as well as to both the co-directors: Kathryn Quinn-Sánchez atksanchez@georgian.edu and Michele Shaul atshaulm@queens.edu (please put the phrase “Label Me Latina/a submission Special Issue Summer 2020” in the subject line).
We do accept simultaneous submissions of creative works. Scholarly articles under consideration should not be submitted elsewhere.

Creative poetry, essays and short fiction should not exceed 30 pages, 12 point font, double-spaced.
Deadline for the Summer 2020 special issue: February 29, 2020.

Please include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Full name
  • Institutional Affiliation
  • Telephone number
  • Email address
  • Regular mail address
  • Title of the submission
  • A brief biography to be included with publication should your submission be selected

Please make sure that the actual manuscript bears no reference to the author’s name or institution.

Label Me Latina/o is an academic journal and as such follows the parameters of definitions set by the academic community. In that community when we refer to Latina/o/x Literature, we are referring to writers of Latin American heritage that live and write in the United States. These can be first generation Latino or fifth but they live and work here in the U.S. Some of these writers write in Spanish, others write in Spanglish like the Nuyorican poets and many of them write in English with a little Spanish thrown in (or not). Scholarly essays should address the work of these writers. The authors of these scholarly essays may be of any ethnicity or nationality. Creative works should be authored by writers who self-define as Latina/o/x and live and write in the United States.

Label Me Latina/o is indexed by the MLA International Bibliography, is listed in the MLA Directory of Periodicals and is a member of Latinoamericana: Asociación de revistas académicas en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Our articles are discoverable on EBSCOhost research databases. ISSN 2333-4584

Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize

This ends in 8 days, so get these in people! The link for submission can be found here

Mission 

The Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize supports the work of emerging Latinx poets. The Prize provides a space for artists who, while part of the largest and fastest growing minority in the United States, are also increasingly diverse in their modes of literary expression. The Prize, therefore, does not privilege any particular style, subject matter, or aesthetic. While not losing sight of the traditions and conditions that gave rise to that literary expression, the Prize has as its goal to nurture the various paths that Latinx poetry is taking in the 21st century.

About the prize

The Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize supports the publication of a first full-length book of poems by a Latinx poet residing in the United States.

The winning poet will receive $1000 and a contract from University of Notre Dame Press. Upon publication of the winning book, Letras Latinas will extend an invitation to both the winner and the judge to give a joint reading at Notre Dame.

The Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize is awarded every other year. There is no entry fee.

The next deadline is January 15, 2020.

Judge: John Murillo

Screeners: Yesenia Montilla and Roberto Carlos Garcia

Eligibility and guidelines

  • Latinx poets residing in the United States who have not published a full-length book.
  • Applicants must be living poets who have neither published, nor committed to publish a book-length collection of poems (48 pages of poems or more) with a registered ISBN, either in the United States or abroad.
  • Poems may have been previously published in periodicals or chapbooks, but the collection must not have been previously published (including self-publications and e-books).
  • Manuscripts must be of original poetry, primarily in English, by one poet. There are no restrictions on the style of poetry or subject matter. Translations are not eligible.
  • Manuscripts must be between 48 and 100 pages of poetry, typed single-spaced (unless the poems are meant to be presented using nonstandard spacing). Multiple poems may not appear on a single page.
  • This page count requirement does not include front matter (i.e. title pages) or back matter (i.e. Acknowledgements pages)
  • Only one manuscript may be submitted per applicant.
  • Include  one title page with your name, address, phone number and e-mail address.
  • Include one title page with only the title and no identifying information
  • The manuscript itself should not contain any information that would reveal the identity of its author.
  • Poets are not eligible to apply if they have studied with the judge in full-time accredited courses within the last three years.
  • Applicants who have published poems in magazines may include acknowledgment notes in an “Acknowledgements” page.
  • Applicants may submit manuscripts elsewhere simultaneously but must notify the Institute for Latino Studies immediately if a manuscript is accepted for publication by another publisher.
  • University of Notre Dame Press will publish the winning manuscript in a paperback edition within one year of the judge’s decision.
  • The Institute for Latino Studies cannot consider manuscript revisions during the course of the contest. The winning poet will have an opportunity to revise before publication.
  • All correspondence concerning the contest should be addressed to:  faragon@nd.edu
  • The Institute for Latino Studies reserves the right to withhold the Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize in any given year.

CfP: Label Me Latina/o

(Un)natural Disasters: Sites of Resistance (Label Me Latina/o Special Issue Summer 2020)

deadline for submissions:
February 5, 2020
full name / name of organization:
Label me Latina
contact email:

For many Latinx communities, the contemporary period can best be described as disastrous:  natural disasters like Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico in 2017, followed by the equally disastrous federal response; the sustained crisis at the US southern border, created through a series of cruel, inhumane, extra-legal, and illegal policies; ICE raids at workplaces that force children to come home from their first day of school to find their parents gone; indefinite separation and detention of children and families; US response to the crisis in Venezuela; detention of US citizens for suspicion of being undocumented; mass deportation with no promise of due process. All of these (and more) suggest that this moment is marked by disaster, as Latinx communities are under siege in ways unprecedented in contemporary America.

This special issue of Label Me Latina/o invites submissions that consider these moments of disaster and crisis, as well as the ways that communities, writers, scholars, and activists resist them. As scholars of Latinx Literature, we know that the current moments of disaster are part of a larger cultural failure to understand the history and role of Latinxs in the United States. While we have long called attention to legacies of state violence, including conquest, colonization, and imperialism, we nonetheless live in a moment in which such legacies are obscured by nationalist fantasies which erase historic Latinx presence in the US, in favor of a rhetoric of invasion and othering.

In response to this, we invite critical and creative manuscripts that consider this moment of (Un)natural Disaster and our resistance to it in light of the following (though this is certainly not limited to these):

  • Border representations
  • Ecological/Environmental disasters
  • Environmental critiques
  • Colonial legacies and their accompanying disasters
  • Imperialism and its disasters
  • Migration and immigration as response to disaster
  • Representations of deportation
  • Representations of detention
  • Civil unrest and protest movements
  • Mourning and memory work
  • Historical novels and re-imaginings
  • Historical repetitions (the use of sites of Indigenous subjugation and of Japanese internment (such as Fort Sill) as current detention centers)
  • Representations of slavery
  • Representations of genocide

While we welcome scholarly and creative work that responds to literary texts, we also understand representation broadly, and encourage work that also looks at representations in popular culture, and media, as well as work that reflects on or contextualizes creative work and performances that are sites of resistance (such as poetry readings, performance art, protest art).  Of particular interest is intersectional work that seeks to contextualize this current moment in light of larger histories of disaster and resistance. In short, while this moment is one in which our communities are under siege on various fronts, Latinx communities have a long history of confronting, resisting and reshaping moments of disaster, and this special edition seeks to highlight that history, as well as provide a space to respond to this particular moment.

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. Label Me Latina/o also publishes creative literary pieces whose authors self-define as Latina, Latino or Latinx regardless of thematic content. Interviews of Latino, Latina or Latinx authors will also be considered. The Co-Directors will publish creative works and interviews in English, Spanish or Spanglish whereas analytical essays should be written in English or Spanish.

Scholarly submissions should be between 12-30 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font and should follow the MLA Style Manual. Please use End Notes rather than Footnotes and place page numbers in the upper right hand corner. Original, unpublished submissions in Microsoft Word (PC compatible format) should be sent electronically to Visiting Editor Lorna Pérez at perezll@buffalostate.edu as well as to both the co-directors: Kathryn Quinn-Sánchez ksanchez@georgian.edu and Michele Shaul shaulm@queens.edu (please put the phrase “Label Me Latina/a submission Special Issue Summer 2020” in the subject line.)

We do accept simultaneous submissions of creative works. Scholarly articles under consideration should not be submitted elsewhere.

Creative poetry, essays and short fiction should not exceed 30 pages, 12 point font, double-spaced.

Deadline for the Summer 2020 special issue: February 5, 2020.

Please include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Full name
  • Institutional Affiliation
  • Telephone number
  • Email address
  • Regular mail address
  • Title of the submission
  • A brief biography to be included with publication should your submission be selected.

 

Please make sure that the actual manuscript bears no reference to the author’s name or institution.

Label Me Latina/o is an academic journal and as such follows the parameters of definitions set by the academic community. In that community when we refer to Latina/o/x Literature, we are referring to writers of Latin American heritage that live and write in the United States. These can be first generation Latino or fifth but they live and work here in the U.S. Some of these writers write in Spanish, others write in Spanglish like the Nuyorican poets and many of them write in English with a little Spanish thrown in (or not). Scholarly essays should address the work of these writers. The authors of these scholarly essays may be of any ethnicity or nationality. Creative works should be authored by writers who self-define as Latina/o/x and live and write in the United States.

 

Label Me Latina/o is indexed by the MLA International Bibliography, is listed in the MLA Directory of Periodicals and is a member of Latinoamericana: Asociación de revistas académicas en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Our articles are discoverable on EBSCOhost research databases. ISSN 2333-4584

CfP:UNDOCU 2.0 at CSU-Long Beach

UNDOCU 2.0

Deadline for proposals is December 27, 2019 via the conference submission portal.

April 16-17, 2020 at California State University, Long Beach.

Flags of US immigrants

California is home to 55,000 beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and to the largest number of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients in the U.S. While TPS and DACA were only temporary solutions, scholars have demonstrated that recipients made significant economic and social gains thanks to the stability and safety that these programs provided (Wong et al. 2017, Rojas-Flores et al. 2019). Beyond DACA and TPS, California is also home to large numbers of mixed-status families, where some members may be undocumented while others have various types of temporary legal status or citizenship. Indeed, 12% of Californians live with an undocumented family member. Across legal statuses and countries of origin, undocumented youth and their families are deeply integrated into the fabric of U.S. communities and contribute to the political, social, economic, and cultural life of our country. With the future of DACA and TPS uncertain, and with an increasing number of young people ineligible for either, what are the prospects for undocumented students, their families and the communities where they live?

In the second annual UndocU conference, we aim to feature the multiple and intersectional identities of undocumented individuals, which are often overlooked and undervalued. We ask: how does the rescission of DACA and TPS compel immigrant youth to think about what it means to be unDACAmented? How might unDACAmented youth draw from the knowledge and experiences of previous undocumented generations? And, how does the increasingly limited access to immigration relief amid heightened surveillance and uncertainty shift how allies, service providers, and educational institutions respond to their diverse needs? Enlisting an asset-based approach, the conference critically asks how we might transform threats to individuals via deportation, workplace raids, and immigration surveillance into collective demands for action with im/migrant families in the lead. And, how does immigration status intersect with student organizing and activism across a range of issues like housing and food security, LGBTQ+ rights, among others?

Please see the conference Call for Proposals, Featured Keynotes, and Conference Registration/Details

CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS

Adriana Andrade Rodriguez, Associated Students Inc., California State University, Long Beach

Beth Baker, Department of Anthropology, California State University, Los Angeles

Caitlin Fouratt, Department of International Studies, California State University, Long Beach

Lauren Heidbrink, Department of Human Development, California State University, Long Beach

Citlalli Ortiz, Associated Students Inc. and For Undocumented Empowered Leaders California State University, Long Beach

Sabrina Rivera, Central American Resources Center-LA’s CSU Project

Kris Zentgraf, Department of Sociology, California State University, Long Beach


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Call for Proposals: Grants for Recovering the US Hispanic Heritage Program / US Latino Digital Humanities (USLDH)

GRANTS-IN-AID

University of Houston

Recovering the US Hispanic Heritage Program / US Latino Digital Humanities (USLDH)

Call for Proposals

GRANTS-IN-AID funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The University of Houston US Latino Digital Humanities (USLDH) program is a digital scholarship/research undertaking to provide training and research on US Latino recovered materials. Proposals must draw from recovered primary and derivative sources produced by Latinas/os in what is now the United States, dating from the Colonial Period to 1980 (such as Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage collections, other repositories and/or the community).

The Grants-in-Aid program is designed to provide a stipend to scholars for research and development of digital scholarship in the form of a digital publication and/or a digital project. The grant covers any expense connected with research that will advance a project to the next stage or to a successful conclusion.

Scholars will have the opportunity to publish their digital scholarship on Arte Público Press’ inaugural APP Digital publication platform. See sample digital scholarship/research on the following sites: Reanimate, CUNY, University of Washington and Temple University Press.

Scholars at different stages of their careers (Academics, librarians, advanced graduate students, independent scholars, etc.) are encouraged to apply for a stipend of up to $7,500 for investigative work. Grantees are expected to budget for a 2-day trip to Houston for in-person training at Recovery. We welcome applications in one of the following areas:

  • Identification, location and recovery of any wide variety of historical documents and/or literary genres, including conventional literary prose and poetry, and such forms as letters, diaries, memoirs, testimonials, periodicals, historical records and written expressions of oral traditions, folklore and popular culture. Any documents that could prove relevant to the goals of the program will also be considered. The emphasis is on works by Mexican/Chicano, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Spanish, Central and South American and other Latina/o residents of what has become the United States, from the Colonial period to 1980.
  • We especially encourage projects highlighting US Latina voices.
  • Bibliographic compilations, indexing projects pertaining to any of the above. Compilation of reference works, e.g. bibliographic dictionaries, thematic datasets, linguistic corpus, etc.
  • Study of recovered primary source(s) for potential digital publication, including: text analysis, thematic dataset creation, visualization, etc.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, project description (2-3 pages), proposed budget (include 2-day visit to Houston), CV and 2 letters of recommendation as a single PDF document via email to recovery@uh.edu by December 20, 2019.

Looking for more information? See here:

https://artepublicopress.com/recovery-program/grantsinaid/?fbclid=IwAR1si5h93y6QHse53qWZsvftPRXawi5omXUNag9lPfPjEz2P0Lo_dH_GO0g