#CFP: Histories and Cultures of Latinas: Suffrage, Activism and Women’s Rights at the University of Houston

Just a reminder!!!!

The deadline for the XV Recovery Conference is Aug. 31st!

#CFP: Histories and Cultures of Latinas: Suffrage, Activism and Women’s Rights

The XV Recovery conference will convene in Houston from February 20 to 22, 2020 to continue the legacy of scholars
meeting to discuss and present their research. The conference theme invites scholars—including archivists, librarians, linguists, historians, critics, theorists and community members–to share examples of the cultural legacy they are recovering, preserving and making available about the culture of the Hispanic world whose peoples resided here, immigrated to or were exiled in the United States over the past centuries.

This conference foregrounds the work of Latinas that focuses on women’s rights, suffrage and education as we usher in a new phase of feminist critical genealogies. We seek papers, panels and posters in either English or Spanish that highlight these many contributions, but also offer us critical ways to rethink issues of agency, gender, sexualities,
race/ethnicity, class and power. Of particular interest are presentations about digital humanities scholarship, methods and practices on these themes.

The end date for Recovery research and themes will now be 1980 in order to give scholars, archivists, linguists and
librarians the stimulus needed to begin recovering the documentary legacy of the 1960s and 1970s, which is fast
disappearing. We encourage papers or panels that make use of archival research that provokes a revision of
established literary interpretations and/or historiographies. Papers or posters on locating, preserving and making
accessible movement(s) documents generated by Latinas and Latinos in those two decades will be welcome.

Studies on the following themes, as manifested before 1960, will be welcome:

● Digital Humanities
● Analytical studies of recovered authors and/or texts
● Critical, historical and theoretical approaches to recovered texts
● Curriculum development: Integrating recovered texts into teaching at university and K-12 levels
● Religious thought and practice
● Folklore/oral histories
● Historiography
● Language, translation, bilingualism and linguistics
● Library and information science
● Social implications, cultural analyses
● Collections and archives: accessioning and critical archive studies
● Documenting the long road/struggle toward equality
● 1960-1980 only movement(s)-related research

Additionally, XV Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage Conference will offer two US Latino Digital Humanities
(USLDH; #usLdh) pre-conference workshops open to conference attendees and members of the public. The workshop
themes are: 1) Using Recovery archives for traditional scholarship and 2) Introduction to Digital Humanities. Preregistration is required, a limited number of scholarships may be available. We welcome general audiences including
undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduate students are encouraged to submit proposals for poster
presentations.

Submit your 250-word abstract for presentations/posters and vitae by email to recovery@uh.edu by August 31, 2019.

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CfP: LSA Biennial Conference

 

LSA 2020

July 15-18, 2020

Call for Papers

Deadline: Nov. 1, 2019 by 5:00 pm EST

Hosted at the University of Notre Dame

South Bend, IN

 Beyond Borders: Latina/o Studies in Times of Crisis

Walls. Children in cages. Natural disasters. Anti-immigrant sentiment. Attacks against LGBTQ communities. Attacks against women’s rights. White supremacy. The criminalization of refugees. Institutional racism. These are just a few signs that remind us that we are living in times of crisis. Though none of these issues are new, their intensity in recent years urgently demands our collective action. The LSA 2020 Conference seeks to provide a space to discuss, strategize, and promote action for the benefit of Latina/o/x communities across borders.

Physical borders are material and concrete divisions that affect the lives of many Latina/o/xs, but also occur in less tangible forms, through structural, systemic, and even psychic borders that divide us both from U.S. society and amongst ourselves. Nationalism, race, ethnicity, class, colorism, sexuality, gender, ability, age, citizenship status, religion, language, and colonialism—and their intersections—produce and perpetuate such borders.

These inequalities are also reflected in the field of Latina/o/x studies itself. By holding the 2020 Conference in South Bend, Indiana—a city in the rural Midwest with an established Latina/o/x community—we encourage participants to engage with scholars, community organizers, and activists beyond the traditional geographical areas (West Coast, Southwest, East Coast, Florida) that are more often represented in our field. Likewise, we encourage participants to consider addressing the experiences of underrepresented communities in Latina/o studies including Afro-Latina/os, Indigenous peoples, LGBTQ, Central and South Americans, linguistic minorities, and non-Hispanophone Latina/os who are often excluded from this category, such as Haitians, the Garífuna, and Brazilians. In addition, we also encourage interdisciplinary deliberation about how to build stronger solidarity networks among scholars, activists, community organizations, artists, and other actors in these times of crisis.

Additional Topics to Consider:

• Decolonizing Latina/o/x Studies

• How do conversations about coloniality, decoloniality, and settler colonialism continue to shape the field?

• Latina/o/x intersectionalities

• How might a rigorous conversation about intersectionality help us further elaborate Latina/o/x studies, its exclusions, and its contributions?

• Disaster discourse

• How is disaster or crisis discourse being used against Latina/o/x communities?

• Ecocriticism

• How do emergent and traditional discourses about the environment and environmentalism help us think through Latina/o/x studies?

• How might addressing the climate crisis help us think of a global Latina/o/x studies,

especially as a possible counter-discourse to neoliberalism and globalization?

• Debt crisis, Hurricane María, and the #RickyRenuncia movement in Puerto Rico

• How would attending to historical, continued, and emergent colonial administrative practices and discourses help us further build a critical conversation around coloniality and debt as exacerbants of Hurricane María’s catastrophic humanitarian, ecological, political, and economic crises?

• Role of Latina/o/xs in the 2020 US election

• How do political theoretical and sociological analyses account for Latina/o/x politics?

• Home countries

• What role can and should Latina/o/x studies scholars play in addressing the conditions in Latin American countries, and their impacts on the hemisphere at large?

Proposal Submission Guidelines:

The program committee welcomes proposals with diverse formats but will give preference to organized panels, roundtables, and workshops. Individual presentations, poster presentations, and other creative formats will also be considered. Submissions for participation should be submitted through the conference management website here.

Please make sure to have the information listed below ready before submission to the system.

Panel proposals must include the following:

• Names of participants (list organizer first, followed by presenters)

• Panel title

• 300-word panel abstract

• Format (e.g. panel, roundtable, workshop ) including A/V needs or special accommodations

• For each presenter, include the following:

• Contact information

• Position or title

• Institutional /organization affiliation

• Discipline (if applicable)

• Title of presentation and 150-word abstract

Individual paper submissions must include the following:

• Name and contact information

• Position or title

• Institutional/organizational affiliation

• Discipline (if applicable)

• Title of presentation and a 400-word abstract.

Proposals are due on Friday Nov. 1, 2019 by 5:00 pm EST. Click here to submit proposal.

CfP: Histories and Cultures of Latinas: Suffrage, Activism and Women’s Rights

 

February 20-22, 2020
University of Houston
Houston, Texas

The XV Recovery conference will convene in Houston from February 20 to 22, 2020 to continue the legacy of scholars meeting to discuss and present their research. The conference theme invites scholars—including archivists, librarians, linguists, historians, critics, theorists and community members–to share examples of the cultural legacy they are recovering, preserving and making available about the culture of the Hispanic world whose peoples resided here, immigrated to or were exiled in the United States over the past centuries. This conference foregrounds the work of Latinas that focuses on women’s rights, suffrage and education as we usher in a new phase of feminist critical genealogies. We seek papers, panels and posters in either English or Spanish that highlight these many contributions, but also offer us critical ways to rethink issues of agency, gender, sexualities, race/ethnicity, class and power. Of particular interest are presentations about digital humanities scholarship, methods and practices on these themes.

The end date for Recovery research and themes will now be 1980 in order to give scholars, archivists, linguists and librarians the stimulus needed to begin recovering the documentary legacy of the 1960s and 1970s, which is fast disappearing. We encourage papers or panels that make use of archival research that provokes a revision of established literary interpretations and/or historiographies. Papers or posters on locating, preserving and making accessible movement(s) documents generated by Latinas and Latinos in those two decades will be welcome. Studies on the following themes, as manifested before 1960, will be welcome:

  • Digital Humanities
  • Analytical studies of recovered authors and/or texts
  • Critical, historical and theoretical approaches to recovered texts
  • Curriculum development: Integrating recovered texts into teaching at university and K-12 levels
  • Religious thought and practice
  • Folklore/oral histories
  • Historiography
  • Language, translation, bilingualism and linguistics
  • Library and information science
  • Social implications, cultural analyses
  • Collections and archives: accessioning and critical archive studies
  • Documenting the long road/struggle toward equality
  • 1960-1980 only movement(s)-related research

Additionally, XV Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage Conference will offer two US Latino Digital Humanities (USLDH; #usLdh) pre-conference workshops open to conference attendees and members of the public. The workshop themes are: 1) Using Recovery archives for traditional scholarship and 2) Introduction to Digital Humanities. Pre-registration is required, a limited number of scholarships may be available. We welcome general audiences including undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduate students are encouraged to submit proposals for poster presentations.

Submit your 250-word abstract for papers/posters and vitae by email to recovery@uh.edu by August 31, 2019.

For details, email us at recovery@uh.edu

To download the PDF, click here.

University of Houston, Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage
4902 Gulf Fwy., Bldg. 19, Room 100 – Houston, TX 77204-2004

CfP: Immersive Pedagogy

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Immersive Pedagogy: A Symposium on Humanities Teaching and Learning with 3D, Augmented and Virtual Reality Carnegie Mellon University, June 27-28, 2019

Call For Proposals

3D, augmented, and virtual reality technologies are becoming increasingly useful for advancing humanistic inquiry and pedagogy through immersive visualizations of spaces, artifacts, and data. Although some academic institutions offer technical support for specific tools, a range of obstacles still deter researchers and students from experimenting with these emerging technologies as teaching and learning tools. As a result, critical engagement with 3D and XR technology remains embryonic.

Immersive Pedagogy: A Symposium on Humanities Teaching and Learning with 3D, Augmented and Virtual Reality, hosted at Carnegie Mellon University on June 27-28, 2019, seeks to bring together librarians, educational technologists, students, scholars, and artists to generate accessible, scaffolded pedagogical materials that integrate scholarly inquiry with technical training. Alongside multiple keynote speakers, during the day-and-a-half symposium participants will collaborate through creative exercises and peer workshops to develop and revise pedagogical material for immersive technology, including lesson plans, learning exercises, course syllabi, and disciplinary curricula.

We invite proposals from scholars across the humanities focused on pedagogically oriented projects, particularly in the fields of Latinx, Latin American, and Caribbean Studies. Proposals should showcase how 3D/XR technologies and related digital humanities and data curation practices intersect with methodologies derived from the following studies:

● Community archives
● Critical digital studies
● Cultural heritage
● Disability studies
● Intersectional feminist theory
● Immigration and migration
● LGBTQ studies
● Minority/underrepresented archives
● Postcolonial/decolonial theory
● Public humanities
● Race and ethnicity

To apply, please submit a 500-word proposal along with a cover sheet with your full name and contact information to ImmersivePedagogy@gmail.com. Applications are due by February 1, 2019. Questions can be sent to the same email address.

Submissions should engage with the pedagogy of 3D/XR technology. They may describe 3D/XR projects for scholarly or public engagement, lesson plans, course syllabi that use existing 3D/XR projects or resources, or theoretical and scholarship on pedagogical practices with 3D/XR technology, among other relevant topics. No previous experience with immersive technology is required to apply, but applicants should specify their level of experience and their reasons for working with the technology from a pedagogical, humanistic, and decolonial perspective. Participants acknowledge and accept that pedagogical materials produced for the conference will be made available to the public under Creative Commons (cc) license.

Participants will be credited by name unless otherwise requested. This symposium is supported by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Council on Library and Information Resources.

For more info: https://immersivepedagogy.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR3Q-zP5gLF7NWAP-MV4bw0X7B2FR4iOSlyGqAk2wbJFRWd4RTJluENiJq0

Breaking Barriers Latinx Youth Conference

In the event there are any youth out there…

 

Breaking Barriers/ Rompiendo Barreras

Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 10 AM – 6 PM

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center

600 River St, Austin, Texas 78701
Breaking Barriers Latinx Youth Conference is a day of art, music, and community dedicated to Latinx youth, presented by the teens of the ESB-MACC Caminos Teen Leadership program. On February 9th, teens will collaborate with emerging artists and cultural activists to facilitate exploration and self-expression around the theme of “breaking barriers”.

Latinx teens may face barriers including cultural sterotypes, negative self-image, gender discrimination, family structure hierarchy, as well as wider issues such as gentrification, language barriers, education roadblocks, immigration status challenges, and even the physical barrier between México and the U.S. How do we break these barriers? How can we build resilience and empower our youth to share their voices? What can we offer to our fellow teens to help us suceed at our personal, professional, and artistic goals?
Conference activities will include screen printing, an open mic stage, self-published zines, live mural painting, a mosaic art project, and teen-facilitated discussions. This event is uniquely created BY teens, FOR teens.

Schedule: 10am – 6pm, with a live music performance by the Tiarra Girls at 5pm.

This event is free for any teen age 13-19 who wants to connect with others through art and culture. Please RSVP on Eventbrite or Facebook. RSVP not required to attend, but those who RSVP will be guaranteed a spot.

What to bring: A blank t-shirt for screenprinting. Snacks are provided and it is recommended to bring $10 for lunch at on-site food trucks. Please come willing to share your voice. To participate in the open-mic, bring any needed instruments. Free parking is available on-site. Students may earn volunteer credit at their school for attending if they get pre-authorization from their school and bring any necessary documentation for a staff signature. Adults may contact the organizers to volunteer at the event.

More about Caminos: CAMINOS is an immersive paid internship empowering Austin-area Teens to carve their own path in the creative arts. Students apply and are accepted into the program for one year, during which they are actively engaged in the various elements of the program which include working with ESB-MACC professional staff; artist mentorships, community engagement, special workshops and cultural events.

Contact: Frederico.Geib@austintexas.gov

More About Tiarra Girls: Multi-Award Winning Best Performing Band. With many musical influences both in English and Spanish which has allowed them to make up their very own unique brand of Alt/Indie/Pop/Rock that is undeniably influenced by their strong family.

CfP: Representations of Afrolatinidad in Global Perspective

Call for Papers

Representations of Afrolatinidad in Global Perspective

University of Pittsburgh

April 11-13, 2019

Conference Convened by the Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative

Contact: Dr. Michele Reid-Vazquez, University of Pittsburgh, mbr31@pitt.edu

 

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science, Brown University

Dr. Nancy Mirabal, Associate Professor, American Studies, Director of the US Latina/o Studies Program, University of Maryland-College Park

 

 

The intersections of race, ethnicity, and representation have shaped historical and contemporary articulations of Afrolatinidad. As an expression of multivalent identity, both shared and unique, Afrolatinidad informs the experiences of over 150 million Afro-Latin Americans and millions more within diasporic communities in the United States, Canada, Europe, and beyond. The conference seeks to foster an international dialogue that addresses regional, national, and transnational links among the ways Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinxs create, sustain, and transform meanings surrounding blackness in political, social, and cultural contexts.

 

This two-day symposium aims to engage multiple depictions of Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinxs – whether self-fashioned or imposed. The varied portrayals in the past and present reflect the ongoing global realities, struggles, vibrancy, and resiliency of Afro-Latin diasporas throughout the Americas and elsewhere. The symposium will feature keynote addresses by Dr. Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science at Brown University, and Dr. Nancy Mirabal, Associate Professor of American Studies and Director of the U.S. Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland-College Park. Their work on Afro-descendant politics in Latin America and Afro-Latinx discourses of race, gender, and territoriality, respectively, will spark broader exchanges around Afrolatinidad and representation among presenters and attendees.

 

We invite submissions that address aspects of Afrolatinidad, particularly through ethnicity/race, gender, history, technology, and expressive culture, such as music, dance and art. We are especially interested in papers that analyze these themes across a variety of conceptual frameworks, including Africana Studies, Anthropology, Caribbean Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Latin American Studies, Latinx Studies, Media Studies, Political Science, and Sociology.

 

Submissions need not be confined to these topics, but, if possible, please indicate at least two themes that correspond to your proposal.

 

Themes:

-Slavery and Its Legacies in Latin America

-Politics of Culture/Cultural Expression

-Visibility and Invisibility

-Theorizing Afro-Latinidad

-Race, Gender, and Migration

-Diaspora, Community, and Technology/Social Media

 

Please submit a title, 250-word abstract, and 2-page CV by January 7, 2019, to Afro-Latin@pitt.edu. If you have questions, please contact Dr. Michele Reid-Vazquez at mbr31@pitt.edu and include “Afrolatinidad Conference” in the subject line. Authors of accepted proposals will be contacted by January 31, 2019, and paper drafts are due March 28, 2019 for pre-circulation with discussants and panelists. In addition to invited keynote, roundtable, and community and curriculum speakers, ten to twelve scholars will be selected to present their work at the symposium. Lodging and meals will be covered for all invited presenters.

 

This event and registration are free and open to the public. The tentative conference schedule is as follows:

 

Thursday, April 11, 2019

4:00-4:15pm   Welcome

4:15-5:00pm   Keynote-Afro-Latin America

5:15-5:30pm   Q&A

5:30-7:00pm   Post-Keynote Reception

 

Friday, April 12, 2019

8:45-10:00am – Session 1

10:00-11:45am – Session 2

Buffet Lunch

1:00-2:45pm – Session 3

2:45-4:15pm – Session 4

4:15-5:15pm – Pre-Keynote Reception

5:15-6:30pm – Keynote-Afro-Latinx

 

Saturday, April 13, 2019

9:00am-10:45am – Session 5 – Curriculum and Community

10:45am-12noon – Session 6 – Wrap Up Roundtable

 

Cosponsors: University of Pittsburgh Office of the Chancellor, Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latinx Studies Initiative, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, Year of Pitt Global, Humanities Center, Center for Latin American Studies, and the Department of Africana Studies

CfP: The Latina/o/x Literature & Culture Society Conference

Call for Papers:
The Latina/o/x Literature & Culture Society
of the American Literature Association
30th Annual Conference: May 23-26, 201
Westin Copley Place, Boston, MA

Deadline: January 2, 2019

In the past, the Latina/o/x Literature and Culture Society has organized panels that focus on literary genre, single authors, children’s literature, speculative fiction, comparative analyses, as well as cultural studies approaches. This year, we welcome a variety of theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches, as well as a variety of panel types, including traditional paper sessions, roundtable discussions, and sessions dedicated to the teaching of Latina/o/x literature. Given the location of the Conference in Boston, we solicit proposals focused on Latina/o/x experiences in Boston and the East Coast more broadly.

Topics for proposed sessions are open. In the spirit of community building, the Latina/o/x Literature and Culture Society attempts to build sessions that bring together participants at various stages of their careers.

Please submit proposals for individual papers as well as full panel and roundtable sessions.

• For individual papers, send a short abstract (150 words) with title, along with institutional affiliation, academic title, and contact information.
• For panel proposals, send paper titles, short abstracts for each paper, (150 words), along with institutional affiliation, academic title, and contact information for each panelist and the panel chair.

DEADLINE: JANUARY 2, 2019.

Please submit proposals and inquiries to:
Cristina Herrera cherrera@mail.fresnostate.edu

For information about the Latina/o/x Literature and Culture Society, visit us online at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/164409943705319/

For more information about the ALA and the conference, including registration information, please visit:
http://americanliteratureassociation.org

CfP: Latin American Studies Association

We’re running out of time to get our abstracts in! And yes, they do have a growing Latinx Studies section no matter what anyone tells you!

http://lasa.international.pitt.edu/eng/index.asp

Congress Theme

Nuestra América: Justice and Inclusion

José Martí’s essay “Nuestra América” was published in 1891 in New York and Mexico City in response to the first Pan-American conference in 1890, which proposed Pan-Americanism as a way to connect North and South America. We invoke and expand the message of “Nuestra América” to promote a hemispheric vision of justice and inclusion in an era when global politics is too often built around walls and securing borders and not on fostering social justice and democracy. Our congress takes place in Boston, Massachusetts, the site of key events in the revolution that resulted in U.S. independence and—along with other momentous episodes in the “age of revolutions,” including the Haitian revolution that abolished slavery— laid the basis for contemporary ideas of democracy and justice.

“Nuestra América: Justice and Inclusion” signals the challenges of social, economic, racial, ethnic, gendered, sexuality-based, and other forms of inequality; the need to promote creative solutions for overcoming them; the importance of scholarship, activism, and policy in this regard; the relevance of changed demographics that make historically marginalized peoples a majority in the continent and recognition of their wide-ranging cultural, linguistic, political, social, and economic contributions; an inclusive definition of justice that relies on truth and facts and incorporates respect and dignity for all peoples; and a broad understanding of rights, both collective and individual.

Hemispheric interactions and cooperation also inform our efforts to connect the 2019 LASA congress to the Latin American and Latino communities in Boston and the Northeast as well as to the rich mix of academic, creative, community, and policy institutions and organizations found there. In the same vein, we want our 2019 congress to be seen, and function as, a bridge to LASA 2020 in Mexico, thus symbolizing the unity and mutual dependence between the different parts of our America. From Mexico, LASA will continue to meet outside the U.S. until a significant shift in climate occurs for immigrants and international visitors and scholars. In submitting proposals for sessions (panels, roundtables, and workshops) LASA members are strongly encouraged to assure diverse representation through the inclusion of minorities, women, graduate students, and to reflect the regional and disciplinary diversity of LASA’s membership. Track co-chairs will use diversity and inclusion as important criteria when evaluating session proposals.