With A New Book, Louie Pérez Of Los Lobos Is Master Storyteller

Check out this NPR article by Felix Contreras and Marisa Arbona-Ruiz. If you go to the site, you can even here an interview: https://www.npr.org/sections/altlatino/2019/01/18/686408433/with-a-new-book-louie-perez-of-los-lobos-is-master-storyteller

 

“There is no such thing as Chicano hippies! And playing Mexican music??”

That was my father’s reaction when I described seeing five honest-to-goodness Chicano hippies with beards and ponytails playing mariachi music at a Chicano student leadership retreat at UC Davis in 1975. Los Lobos del Este de Los Angeles, the group called themselves.

Three years later, there was a bright yellow album cover with a drawing of a nopal plant and an inlay photo of those very same Chicano hippies that proclaimed themselves as ‘Just Another Band from East LA.’ They were still playing Mexican folk music and that record was a staple of Chicano activist parties during my college years in Fresno, Calif.

Then, nothing. For five years. Until they came roaring out of the LA punk scene with electric instruments turned up to 11 rocking corridos, a Ritchie Valens song and the first three originals by David Hidalgo and Louie Perez, a song writing team that would redefine Chicano musical expression and win legions of fans around the world.

Good Morning, Aztlán : The Words, Pictures and Songs of Louie Pérez (published by Tia Chucha Press) has just been published and it is a breathtaking examination of Pérez ‘s masterful storytelling in the name of sharing the lesson that we have more in common than we are different.

This week, Pérez sits down for a wide-ranging interview about the book, his own story, his creative bond with David Hidalgo that stretches back to the 11th grade and his commitment to telling the stories of the world as he has seen it from countless tour buses.

Good Morning, Aztlán has songs as well as short stories, poetry and philosophical riffs all written by Pérez and we selected a few to include in the show. Big thanks to Alt.Latino contributor Marisa Arbona-Ruiz‘s multi-talented acting skills for the dramatic readings on the show this week. Get your tissues out for her reading of “Little John Of God” one of Pérez ‘s most powerfully emotional songs.

With David Hidalgo as his writing partner and the rest of Los Lobos as the vehicle that brings those stories to life, Louie Pérez has created an imaginary world full of real life joys and pains and wonder that seems worlds away from the hippie mariachi I saw. But the through line going back to 8-year-old Louie Pérez of East LA has been his fascination with the written word. And we all have benefited from that.

Tia Chucha’s online bookstore

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2018 Best Latino/Latin American History Books

Alejandra Oliva puts out another banger of a 2018 list for Remezcla here: http://remezcla.com/lists/culture/2018-latino-latin-american-history-books/ 

Please note not every book on this list is US Latinx proper.

 

There’s no reason studying and academic books have to stay in school – often, scholars are working on telling stories about fascinating intersections between art, culture, and politics that don’t have “mass-market appeal.” Unfortunately, smaller projected audiences often translate to higher prices, or more niche-academic language, but a good writer and a good scholar will write a text everyone can get into.

Here are some books that tell good stories, or can help you get an overview of topics you care a lot about. We’ve tried to get a little bit of everything: food, music, art, politics. Poke around, order books from your local library, use bibliographies to track down other writers you might also want to be in conversation with, and do a little studying outside of school!

Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture Ed Morales (Verso)

In Latinx, Morales argues for a growing portion of American culture – a gender-neutral term for a cross-national, multi-and-inter-racial group that has so far gone largely unrecognized on the stage of national culture. Latinx provides a history of Latinx people in the United States, and suggests that they might be a key to the future.

Pop América, 1965-1975, Esther Gabara (Duke University Press)

An academic book that doubles as a coffee table tome! A guide to accompany a traveling exhibit of Latin American pop art, this book comes with plenty of colorful images, as well as essays that trace the art movement’s origins across Latin America.

A Library for the Americas: The Nettie Lee Benson Latin America Collection, ed. Julianne Gilliand and Jose Montelongo (University of Texas Press)

UT Austin has one of the best collections of Latin American rare books and artifacts, and this tome will bring them into your home library. Showcasing the treasures of the library in full color, you’ll be able to page through treasures of Latin American history – codexes, paintings, and more.

A Massacre in Mexico: The True Story Behind the Missing Forty-Three Students, Anabel Hernandez, trans. John Washington (Verso)

Since 2014, the murder of 43 Mexican students from Ayotzinapa has been a dark and unsolved mystery that has come to symbolize everything wrong with Mexican politics and corruption. Here, journalist Anabel Hernandez does her best to unravel the mystery behind the massacre, and in the process, shines a harsh and unforgiving light on Mexican politics and government.

Latinx Literature Unbound: Undoing Ethnic Expectation, Ralph E. Rodriguez (Fordham University Press)

The last few years have seen an explosion of Latinx lit, and in this volume, Ralph E. Rodriguez attempts to figure out exactly what that means. What is Latinx lit? What does it mean to have a critical framework surrounding it? Read this for a more meta look at the books you already love.

Cuba: The Cookbook, Madelaine Vázquez Gálvez and Imogene Tondre (Phaidon)

If you’re looking for an absolutely beautiful showstopper of a book on everything to do with Cuban cuisine, this is it. Basically a food showroom (nice to look at and dream about, not always easy or practical to make), this is the kind of cookbook you might sit down and read, cover to cover.

Sounds of Crossing: Music, Migration, and the Aural Poetics of Huapango Arribeño, Alex E. Chavez

Chavez uses the songs of the borderlands to talk about immigration into the US and the culture that has sprung up around the border. He pulls in both history and current situations – and best of all, his own experiences as a Mexican academic and musician – to create a multidimensional, gorgeous book.

XI International Conference on Chicano Literature and Latino Studies

Is anyone going to be in Spain at the end of May?! Great opportunity for a conference…

XI International Conference on Chicano Literature and Latino Studies

original post by Xanath Caraza found here: https://labloga.blogspot.com/2018/04/xi-international-conference-on-chicano.html

The XI International Conference on Chicano Literature and Latino Studies, organized by HispaUSA and the Universidad de Salamanca, with the collaboration of the instituto Franklin-UAH, will be held in Salamanca, May 28-30, 2018.

This conference draws attention to the different interpretations of the concept “Latinidad” at the present time, also looking towards the future.  Therefore, “Latinidad” involves the blend of cultures recreating different identities, often forgotten in an exercise of permanent reconstruction.

Durante más de dos décadas un grupo de profesores, académicos e intelectuales españoles y norteamericanos han venido estudiando de forma conjunta la realidad de los hispanos en Estados Unidos.  Es precisamente fruto de este encuentro por lo que surge HispaUSA.  Una asociación sin ánimo de lucro, cuyos fines son estimular, fomentar e impulsar el estudio y la investigación en todas las áreas relacionadas con la cultura y la sociedad hispana en los Estados Unidos; así como fomentar la interrelación entre el mundo hispano de Estados Unidos y España.

HispaUSA tiene su sede en el Instituto Franklin de la Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, un centro que desde 1987 ha impulsado el estudio de Norteamérica así como la colaboración institucional entre Estados Unidos y España.

Este 2018 en Salamanca del 28 al 30 de mayo se lleva a cabo la XI International Conference on Chicano Literature and Latino Studies.

Trying to make sense of the border, a review by Donna Miscolta

This review by Donna Miscolta was written for the Seattle Review of Books. Show some love and go to their site: http://www.seattlereviewofbooks.com/reviews/trying-to-make-sense-of-the-border/

It is a review of Francisco Cantu’s The Line Becomes a River.

When I was a college student in San Diego, I worked part-time at the Natural History Museum doing a variety of jobs. I was a zoology major and was once invited to join the herpetologist and his student assistants in the field. We drove over the mountains and dropped into the desert near the border. I was the only brown person in the car, and when a border patrol helicopter whirred overhead, one of the assistants yelled, with mock urgency, “Hide Donna!” Presumably, that’s what they would’ve done had I been undocumented, though that wasn’t the word in use in the 70s.

Later as we walked in the desert, two white men, seemingly out of nowhere, emerged from a path. “Hey, Maria,” one of them called out to me (because, you know, we’re all named Maria), “you legal?”

Such is the racism born of the border.

That afternoon, we happened upon a sidewinder sidewinding its way toward Mexico. We watched it speed away from us, the triple curve of its body swishing telltale tracks in the sand.

In The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border, Francisco Cantú describes guiding a snake to a gap in the pedestrian fence so it can make its way into Mexico. This act of accommodation comes after Cantú picks up a migrant named de la Vega from the hospital where he had been treated for kidney failure and drives him to the border patrol station to be processed for deportation.

De la Vega is released from the hospital shirtless, the way he had been found after wandering for six days in the desert. Cantú strips off his own shirt and gives it to him, a humanitarian gesture that goes only so far against the pitiless deportation system.

The migrant who is deported. The snake that is gently nudged through a physical barrier that divides its natural territory. The juxtaposition is a theme that runs through the book: the harsh borderland desert that is habitat to animals and gauntlet to humans.

In these scenes, Cantú is in his first year as a border agent, a job he seeks after academic studies of border policies and politics have rendered the subject too remote and abstract for a true understanding — despite his having grown up near the border, despite the concerns of his mother, who tells him, “The border is in our blood.”

“I don’t know if the border is a place for me to understand myself, but I know there’s something here I can’t look away from,” Cantú writes.

Cantú can’t look away from de la Vega’s naked torso, or the feet of a woman whose blisters he washes and salves. But he is able to accept the abandonment of a dead man on the side of the road by a colleague because transport wasn’t available until the next day.

“We stood for a few more minutes talking about the storm and the human body that lay there in the desert, in the dark and in the rain, and we talked of the animals that might come in the night and of the humidity and the deadly heat that would come with the morning. We talked, and then we went home.”

Such dissociation is what his mother warns about and what he himself comes to fear. But as long as he’s in uniform, he must abide by it. While at the firing range one day, he shoots a small bird perched upon the target to prove to himself that he can take a life. He picks up the bird and holds it in his hands. He digs a hole and buries it. He covers the mound with small stones.

He’s trying to get good at his job, he tells his mother. He’ll figure out what it means later, he insists. But his dreams are trying to tell him what it means now. A wolf haunts his sleep with the threat of impending violence. He is grinding his teeth to bits. He is anxious from lack of sleep. After one particularly violent dream, he realizes he must make peace with the wolf, and he addresses him as “brother.”

Later, no longer a field agent but working in intelligence at a desk job, he sees a falcon on one of the camera feeds. The falcon’s unblinking stare probes Cantú’s conscience: “What cowardice has caused you to retreat from the desert? Why not return to the border’s smoldering edges, why not inhabit the quiet chaos churning in your mind?”

After four years, Cantú leaves the border patrol. He takes a job in a coffee shop while he studies writing to make sense of the things he’s seen and done. José, the maintenance man with whom Cantú talks and shares food each day, says, “He visto muchas cosas.” As if to say, my story counts for something, too.

José’s story assumes the spotlight in the last part of the book, when Cantú comes up against the very system he once worked for trying to help his friend, whom he calls brother, to stay in this country. It’s when José speaks that we understand why, despite the law, despite the border patrol, despite the desert, people cross the border again and again.

Cantú has faced backlash on Twitter and at some of his public events for his stint as a border agent. Could he have interrogated the institution and the violence it engenders without becoming part of it? Could he have articulated the complexities without having worn the uniform?

I don’t believe he thinks he could’ve. There’s a deep and tortured honesty in his writing that comes not just from having the border in his blood, but also from introducing the border patrol into his psyche: “It’s like something inside of me still belongs to it. I’m still part of this thing that crushes.”

But Cantú also crushes something. With José’s story, he thwarts the racialized stereotype that has been used to dehumanize migrants and immigrants. And with this book, he reminds us that the border, which as yet is not a wall, is in some places an imaginary line in the middle of a river. That the border is not just a physical structure. The border is in the blood of millions of people — like Cantú, and like me.

Books in this review:

  • The Line Becomes a River
    by Francisco Cantú
    Riverhead Books
    February 06, 2018
    256 pages
    Purchased by SRoB

    Buy on IndieBound

About the writer

Donna Miscolta is the author of the story collection Hola and Goodbye (Carolina Wren Press, 2016) and the novel When the de la Cruz Family Danced (Signal 8 Press, 2011). Follow her on Facebook or visit her website.

Follow Donna Miscolta on Twitter: @DonnaMiscolta

UT Austin XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures

I believe I’ve posted on this before, but this is a good reminder since the deadline is coming up!

XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures
Call For Papers
Transcending Categories in the Hispanic/Latinx World

The graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin are pleased to announce the XXIII Graduate Colloquium to be held on March 30-31st, 2018. This colloquium will examine the dialogue and discourse of crossing and the intersection of subjectivities across underrepresented groups in the Hispanic/Latinx world. At its broadest this colloquium asks: Who are we/they? How does one become constituted as a we or a they? How does an “I” intersect with an “Other”? And how do the various subjectivities within an “I” or a “we” intersect culturally and linguistically? What part does language play in these crossing of socially constructed categories? In recent years, the fields of gender, race, sexuality, disability, and indigeniety have proposed an array of theories to contend with these questions. We invite collaborators to delve into, explore and build upon the latest theorizations on these topics from a plurality of perspectives. Papers on literature, linguistics, cultural studies and interdisciplinary work are all welcome. Presentations may be given in Spanish, Portuguese or English.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

• Identity, subjectivities, and assemblage theory
• Race, gender, sexuality, and dis/ability,
• Colonial history, indigeneity, and critical race theory
• Transnationalism, borders, and immigration
• Literature, film, music, new media
• Visual, sound and performance Studies
• Geographic, political, and spatial configurations
• Pedagogy, education, technology
• Languages across cultures

Deadline and Proposal Guidelines: Submit an abstract of up to 300 words by January 22, 2018 to utspcolloquium2018@gmail.com Include your name, “Conference Proposal” and either “Linguistics,” “Hispanic,” or “LusoBrazilian” in the message subject line. Please attach two documents, one with your name, affiliation, e-mail address and title of presentation, and a second document with title and abstract only as a .pdf or MS word file.

César Chávez Fellowships at Dartmouth

César Chávez Fellowships

The César Chávez Fellowships support scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. The Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers. We invite applications for both a predoctoral dissertation fellowship and a postdoctoral fellowship.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ PREDOCTORAL DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Dissertation Fellowship. The fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a two-year residential fellowship. Fellows are expected to complete the dissertation before the second year and then transition to a postdoctoral appointment. Throughout, fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the department and the college. During the second year of residency, fellows teach one course. The first year, fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $36,000 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses; as a postdoctoral fellow in the second year, the stipend is approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-20 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your motivations to join a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the dissertation advisor and address the projected timeline for completion.

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47327

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Postdoctoral Fellowship. The Fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a one-year residential fellowship, with one course to be taught in Winter or Spring Quarter. Fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the LALACS program and the college. Fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-19 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your interests in joining a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation. For ABD candidates, at least one of the letters should explicitly address the timeline for dissertation completion. Fellows are expected to have a PhD in hand at the time of appointment (usually by July 1, 2018).

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47328

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CfP: XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures @ UT Austin

XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures

Call For Papers
Transcending Categories in the Hispanic/Latinx World

The graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin are pleased to announce the XXIII Graduate Colloquium to be held on March 30- 31st, 2018. This colloquium will examine the dialogue and discourse of crossing and the intersection of subjectivities across underrepresented groups in the Hispanic/Latinx world.

At its broadest this colloquium asks: Who are we/they? How does one become constituted as a we or a they? How does an “I” intersect with an “Other”? And how do the various subjectivities within an “I” or a “we” intersect culturally and linguistically? What part does language play in these crossing of socially constructed categories? In recent years, the fields of gender, race, sexuality, disability, and indigeniety have proposed an array of theories to contend with these questions. We invite collaborators to delve into, explore and build upon the latest theorizations on these topics from a plurality of perspectives. Papers on literature, linguistics, cultural studies and interdisciplinary work are all welcome. Presentations may be given in Spanish, Portuguese or English.

Topics may include but are not limited to:
– Identity, Subjectivities, and Assemblage Theory
– Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Dis/ability,
– Colonial history, Indigeneity, and critical race theory
– Transnationalism, borders, and immigration
– Literature, Film, Music, New Media
– Visual, Sound and Performance Studies
– Geographic, Political, and Spatial Configurations- Pedagogy, Education, Technology
– Languages across cultures

Deadline and Proposal Guidelines: Submit an abstract of up to 300 words by December 30, 2017 to utspcolloquium2018@gmail.com Include your name, “Conference Proposal” and either “Linguistics,” “Hispanic,” or “LusoBrazilian” in the message subject line. Please attach two documents, one with your name, affiliation, e-mail address and title of presentation, and a second document with title and abstract only as a .pdf or MS word file.

Al Hurricane, Influential New Mexico Balladeer, Dies at 81

I’m a little late with this, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the passing of Al Hurricane, one of New Mexico’s finest musicians…

Original article by Simon Romero here

ALBUQUERQUE — Al Hurricane, an eye-patch-wearing balladeer who forged a pioneering musical style by playfully blending New Mexico folk music with the rhythms of rock, jazz and country, died on Sunday at his home here. He was 81.

His granddaughter Samantha Sánchez said the cause was complications of prostate cancer.

Mr. Hurricane, who was born Alberto Nelson Sánchez, was widely known as the “godfather” of the New Mexico musical styles he helped develop, performing at times with his younger brothers, the musicians Tiny Morrie(Amador Sánchez) and Baby Gaby (Gabriel Sánchez).

In the 1970s and ’80s, a period when Hispanic cultural figures were rising to prominence in New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest, Mr. Hurricane gained fame singing in both Spanish and English, and often in Spanglish, as the Sánchez clan’s most eminent sibling.

As a traveling musician, he performed in nightclubs, at municipal fiestas, in concert halls and on television shows, like the nationally syndicated “Val de la O Show,” produced in Albuquerque.

His original songs included “(El Corrido de) La Prisión de Santa Fe,” about one of the nation’s deadliest prison riots, in which 33 inmates were killedover 36 hours on Feb. 2, 1980, at the now-shuttered Penitentiary of New Mexico.

Mr. Hurricane nurtured longstanding ties with Latin American musical traditions. He put his own twist on genres like the corrido, the borderland ballad of four-line stanzas, and the cumbia, which is thought to have originated on Colombia’s Caribbean coast.

Al Hurricane La Mucura Video by 505newmexico1

He was born on July 10, 1936, in the village of Dixon in northern New Mexico, the eldest of four children of parents who moved around New Mexico, the family in tow, in search of opportunity.

His father, José, was a miner who took the family to the town of Silver City; his mother, Bennie, worked as a department store clerk, seamstress, photographer’s assistant and nurse before focusing on promoting the musical talents of her children.

Mr. Hurricane said he had gotten his stage name when he was a child, an affectionate reference to his habit of running around and knocking things over.

His family moved to Albuquerque when he was 9, and he graduated from Albuquerque High School. He became a troubadour as a teenager, performing at restaurants in Old Town.

While on his way to perform in Denver in 1969, the vehicle he was traveling in flipped over five times. He was thrown out of a window, and a shard of glass embedded in his right eye. With the loss of the eye he took to wearing an eye patch.

He continued to tour and recorded dozens of albums. When not on the road, he often headlined shows at the Far West, the Sánchez family’s own nightclub in Albuquerque.

In 1986 his 2-year-old daughter, Lynnea, died from internal bleeding, and his estranged wife, Angela Sanchez, and her boyfriend, Ruben Lopez, were found guilty of child abuse and sentenced to several years in prison.

Afterward Mr. Hurricane suffered a heart attack, which he attributed, in an interview with the newspaper The New Mexican in 1998, to the stress of losing his daughter.

His marriage to Ms. Sánchez ended in divorce, as did his previous marriage, to Nettie Fleming. In addition to his granddaughter Samantha Sánchez, he is survived by seven children, 14 other grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

Photo

Mr. Hurricane, center, in 2011 with former Senator Pete V. Domenici of New Mexico and former Representative Heather Wilson. CreditPat Vasquez-Cunningham/The Albuquerque Journal, via Associated Press

After recovering from the heart attack, Mr. Hurricane returned to writing songs and touring. As he grew older he wore a jet-black toupee. He also campaigned for politicians, including Susana Martinez, the conservative Republican who is serving her second term as New Mexico’s governor.

His last major performance was in May, at a concert in his honor in Albuquerque.

A raconteur who regaled visitors with tales of his childhood and the music business, Mr. Hurricane reveled in his fame. Sometimes he meditated on cultural and economic shifts.

“I am very disappointed, not in the music, but in the fact that the internet’s taking over everything,” he told The New Mexican in 2015. He lamented how challenging it had become for musicians to sell their music.

But he showed an appreciation for newer genres, like reggaeton, which originated in Puerto Rico in the 1990s. “As for the music,” he said, “some of it’s beautiful.”

New Book: Chicano Popular Culture, 2nd ed. by Charles Tatum

Chicano Popular Culture, Second Edition provides a fascinating, timely, and accessible introduction to Chicano cultural expression and representation. New sections discuss music with an emphasis on hip-hop and rap; cinema and filmmakers; media, including the contributions of Jorge Ramos and María Hinojosa; and celebrations and other popular traditions, including quinceañeras, cincuentañeras, and César Chávez Day.

This edition features:

    • Chicanas in the Chicano Movement and Chicanos since the Chicano Movement
    • New material on popular authors such as Denise Chávez, Alfredo Vea, Luis Alberto Urrea, and Juan Felipe Herrera
    • Suggested Readings to supplement each chapter
    • Theoretical approaches to popular culture, including the perspectives of Norma Cantú, Alicia Gaspar de Alba, Pancho McFarland, Michelle Habell-Pallán, and Víctor Sorell

With clear examples, an engaging writing style, and helpful discussion questions, Chicano Popular Culture, Second Edition invites readers to discover and enjoy Mexican American popular culture.

 

Original post found here: http://www.uapress.arizona.edu/Books/bid2718.htm

CfP: Label Me Latina/o

I’ve worked with these folks on two occasions now and they are wonderful…

http://labelmelatin.com/?page_id=2

Label Me Latina/o

CALL FOR SCHOLARLY ESSAYS AND CREATIVE WORKS

 

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. Label Me Latina/o also publishes creative literary pieces whose authors self-define as Latina or Latino regardless of thematic content. Interviews of Latino or Latina authors will also be considered. The Co-Directors will publish creative works and interviews in English, Spanish or Spanglish whereas analytical essays should be written in English or Spanish.

Scholarly submissions should be between 12-30 pages, double-spaced, 12 point font and should follow the MLA Style Manual. Please use End Notes rather than Footnotes and place page numbers in the upper right hand corner. Original, unpublished submissions in Microsoft Word (PC compatible format) should be sent electronically to both of the co-directors: Kathryn Quinn-Sánchez ksanchez@georgian.edu and Michele Shaul shaulm@queens.edu

We do accept simultaneous submissions of creative works. Scholarly articles under consideration should not be submitted elsewhere.

Creative poetry, essays and short fiction should not exceed 30 pages, 12 point font, double-spaced.

Deadline for the Spring 2018 issue: January 15, 2018.

Please include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Full name
  • Institutional Affiliation
  • Telephone number
  • Email address
  • Regular mail address
  • Title of the submission
  • A brief biography to be included with publication should your submission be selected.

Please make sure that the actual manuscript bears no reference to the author’s name or institution.

Label Me Latina/o is an academic journal and as such follows the parameters of definitions set by the academic community. In that community when we refer to Latina/o Literature, we are referring to writers of Latin American heritage that live and write in the United States. These can be first generation Latino or fifth but they live and work here in the U.S. Some of these writers write in Spanish, others write in Spanglish like the Nuyorican poets and many of them write in English with a little Spanish thrown in (or not). Scholarly essays should address the work of these writers. The authors of these scholarly essays may be of any ethnicity or nationality. Creative works should be authored by writers who self-define as Latino and live and write in the United States.

Label Me Latina/o is indexed by the MLA International Bibliography, is listed in the MLA Directory of Periodicals and is a member of Latinoamericana: Asociación de revistas académicas en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales. Our articles are discoverable on EBSCOhost research databases. ISSN 2333-4584