La Pastorela: An Old Los Angeles Christmastime Tradition

Victoria Bernal wrote this in 2016. It turns out that two years later, it’s still good! https://www.kcet.org/shows/lost-la/la-pastorela-an-old-los-angeles-christmastime-tradition?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=kcet&fbclid=IwAR1Cha_12jBgbjie_C1UIpCKvSNFBuSSJEEGmnL1Tmd0g5DLBZUTYDuIp_I

While historians and musicologists in Texas and New Mexico have documented the Pastorelas in their regions, there have only been scattered attempts to study it in Southern California – until now. John Koegel, a music professor at California State University Fullerton, is writing a book about Mexican musical theater in Los Angeles and, in an interview, articulated the rich history of the La Pastorela in the city. “La Pastorela was mostly an amateur tradition that reflected popular piety – a folk expression of strongly held beliefs performed as theatrical and musical entertainment.” As Koegel notes, specifics about the play’s history can be elusive.

1883 Los Angeles Herald advertisement for Los Pastores performance
An advertisement for a Pastores performance from the Los Angeles Herald

One challenge in understanding this tradition in Los Angeles is that although local archives preserve complete playscripts with song lyrics and dialogue, they do not include the music that accompanied performances. At the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County resides a Pastorela manuscript purportedly dated 1839 that was owned by Antonio Coronel, a respected public figure in nineteenth-century Los Angeles. In his memoir, Bandini mentioned Coronel’s important role in producing La Pastorela for St. Vincent’s College (the predecessor of Loyola Marymount University). Bandini was thrilled to be cast in this production as the Archangel even if his tissue-paper angel wings caught fire when an elderly near-sighted women held her candle too close to him. The flames were extinguished by the actor playing the devil, an irony not lost on Bandini, who described the moment he went from “white angel to fiery devil.”

Old Southern California periodicals abound with mentions of Pastorela performances. In 1883, the Los Angeles Herald reported that Los Pastores was so popular that another performance was given in February at Turnverein Hall on Figueroa Street. Just over 100 years ago, the Hidalgo Club, a Mexican mutual aid society, revived La Pastorela for performances in several halls in the Plaza area. The December 1931 issue of the Auto Club’s Touring Topics magazine documented performances of Los Pastores given by Mexican agricultural workers in La Habra, Fullerton, Corona, Upland, and Placentia. The reporter explained that the previous year, “a group organized and trained at Placentia by an almost illiterate orange picker gave more than 25 performances between Christmas Eve and February, traveling all over Southern California in an open truck.”

While the general premise of La Pastorela remains the same, renditions evolve to reflect the times. When PBS broadcast Luis Valdez and El Teatro Compensino’s La Pastorela in 1991, the devil took several forms – Hell’s Angels, a wealthy Californio rancher, and a Middle East sultan. In the 2016 version performed at the Frida Kahlo Theater, evil was represented by a diabolical character named Donald. La Pastorela continues to be performed on the old Plaza, across from the Pico House and Olvera Street, its performance following another Los Angeles Christmastime tradition, Las Posadas.

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CfP: Border-lines: Journal of the Latino Research Center

CALL FOR PAPERS: BORDER-LINES: JOURNAL OF THE LATINO RESEARCH CENTER

Gloria Anzaldúa in her germinal works describes the borderlands as a material place and as a space that shifts to the metaphorical and symbolic. Borderlines delineate systems in which our societies are also arranged and dispersed. Borders and the borderlands are emotional, mental, psychic, spiritual, and material. Border-Lines is a journal of the Latino Research Center housed at the University of Nevada, Reno. As a journal entering a new decade of its publication, the Border-Lines continues a legacy of publishing scholarly excellence with a commitment to offer space to interdisciplinary and intersectional studies. We do not build walls when we are afraid. We do not erect borders between identity categories, scholarly traditions, art, or activism. Border-Lines is a journal that blurs the spaces between and betwixt identity, theory, and disciplines. This call for papers requests interdisciplinary research that analyze, describe, or make interventions at the boundaries of what constitutes border theory, research in/on the borderlands, and/or the people who live in these spaces and places. Some suggested areas of interest (but not limited to those listed here):

  • Family separation policies and procedures
  • Latina/o/x Issues in Nevada
  • Indigenous Studies of Nevada
  • Jotería cultura, theory, activism, and art
  • Arts-based approaches to research methodology
  • Engaged and/or participant action research
  • Chicana feminist theory and praxis
  • Latinidad in the current political climate
  • Interdisciplinary border studies International borders outside U.S. context
  • Chicana art, spirituality, and activism Latino/a cultural and media representations
  • Testimonios from the borderlands (material, mental, emotional, spiritual, metaphorical)
  • Monstrosity in Popular Culture
  • Educational Pipelines for Latinx and Chicanx student and faculty
  • Rhetorical deconstructions of border discourses and texts

This issue will be published in the Late Spring of 2019, and all submissions should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Submit manuscript to Dr. Robert Gutierrez-Perez, rgutierrezperez@unr.edu with the title: “Border-Lines 2019 Submission” by midnight on November 15th, 2018
  • A Cover Page in .pdf format that lists the title of your manuscript, your name, affiliation, mailing address, and email contact information.
  • Manuscript should adhere to the latest Chicago style guide and should be between 5,000-7,000 words. Please make sure to remove any identifying information from your manuscript.
  • Submissions will undergo a peer-review process after editor review. Any questions should be directed to the editor: rgutierrezperez@unr.edu

Teatro Vivo’s Real Women Have Curves

Real Women Have Curves, a comedy by Josefina López, directed by Claudia M. Chávez, presented by Teatro Vivo, a bilingual Latina/o theater company in Austin, Texas.

While they work in a tiny sewing factory, a group of women talk about their husbands and lovers, their children, and their dreams for the future. Ana, the youngest among them, just graduated from high school and dreams of going off to college. Although she needs the money, Ana doesn’t like working at the factory. But she keeps going to work and slowly gains an understanding and appreciation of the work and the women. From the perspective of the Latina immigrant experience, this story celebrates women, their power, and the incredible bond that happens when women work together.

Featuring Eva McQuade, Martinique Duchene-Phillips, Minerva Villa, Ana Laura de Santiago, and Gina Marie Hinojosa.

August 3-19, 2019
Thursday – Saturday 8:00 PM
Sunday 2:00 PM

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
600 River Street, Austin, Texas

*Contains adult language

Click here for tickets: https://teatrovivo.org/

Announcing the Playwrights for the Austin Latino New Play Festival 2018

The festival is April 19-21, 2018 at the Mexican American Cultural Center in Austin, TX.

https://teatrovivo.org/2018/03/12/announcing-the-playwrights-for-the-austin-latino-new-play-festival-2018/

Teatro Vivo is excited to announce the playwrights for the the 8th annual Austin Latino New Play Festival. The festival will be presented in collaboration with ScriptWorks, April 19-21, 2018 at the Emma S. Barrientos – Mexican American Cultural Center.

The ALNPF unites playwrights and audience members in conversation surrounding new works of Latino theatre. After each performance, the playwright participates in a talkback session with the audience. The ALNPF features four new plays by playwrights from throughout the U.S., including a play for young audiences. The four plays explore cross-cultural themes and dilemmas that surprise, challenge, engage, and push the dramatic envelope.

With support from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures, the playwrights will join us in Austin to workshop and further develop their work.

Atacama by Augusto Federico Amador

Thirty years after the dirty war waged by the General Pinochet regime on the Chilean people. Two strangers search the Atacama Desert for their buried loved ones and discover there are darker truths awaiting them underneath the hard sands of the Atacama.

Augusto Federico Amador was born and raised in the Silicon Valley and is the son of an accomplished Peruvian Jazz composer and an Austrian mother. Mr. Amador has recently been awarded the prestigious Lincoln City Fellowship from Speranza Foundation for playwriting. Atacama placed in 50 Playwright Project’s 2017 list of best unproduced Latino plays, as well as a runner up for the 2017 National Latino Playwriting Award from the Arizona Theater Company. His plays have been finalists or semi-finalists for several awards, including the Eugene O’Neill Conference, Princess Grace Award, Terrence McNally Award, Metlife Foundation National Latino Playwright Award, New Works Labs at Stratford, and the Lee Strasberg Theater, among others.

American (Tele)visions by Victor I. Cazares 

The Canales family just can’t catch a break: The dad gets impaled with the TV antenna, the mom and Stanley the truck driver have run off with half their doublewide mobile home, the brother is dead and is reanimated by his gay Vietnamese lover, and Erica…Erica is a kids’s TV dinner tray with lots of sodium and dreams. You know, just your typical undocumented Mexican family living in the shadow of the first Wal-Mart in the history of the American Universe. Now please someone get them an HBO show. Elevator Pitch: “Estos Somos Nosotros” meets Super Mario NES.

Victor I. Cazares was born twice on paper: in El Paso, Texas and San Lorenzo, Chihuahua, Mexico. His plays have been read, developed, or produced at American Repertory Theatre, Amherst College, Brown University, New York Theatre Workshop, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Red Fern Theatre Company, and the Yale School of Drama. Cazares holds an M.F.A. from Brown University and a B.A. in History of Art from Yale University where he received a Josef Albers Fellowship and a Sudler Grant. He lives, forages, and produces his social media telenovela, El Amor en Tiempos de Trump in Portland, Oregon.

Dulce by Ramon Esquivel (A Play for Young Audiences)

A boy named Memo learns that Abuelita, his beloved grandmother, has died. Unsure of how to feel, Memo decides to find Abuelita’s hidden stash of candy. But his mother Luisa and older sister Ceci are too caught up in their own grief to help, so Memo turns to an unexpected ally in his search for the dulce: Abuelita herself! Memo journeys with Abuelita through her memories as a child in Mexico and a young immigrant in the USA, and he discovers that the true treasure Abuelita left for him is familia. A play for young audiences (ages 8+) and families, Dulce draws on both magical realism and slapstick comedy to tell a story about cultural identity, intergenerational ties, and learning how to say goodbye.

Ramón Esquivel is a playwright based in the Pacific Northwest. He teaches playwriting and theatre education at Central Washington University. In 2017, his play Luna was produced at the University of Texas and toured Austin-area schools. Luna is featured in Palabras del Cielo: An Exploration of Latina/o Theatre for Young Audiences, a play anthology from Dramatic Publishing. The Hero Twins: Blood Race, an original story inspired by Mayan mythology, premieres in April at Appalachian Young People’s Theatre in North Carolina. Above Between Below, a play about bullying, is currently touring middle schools in Washington and Oregon through a partnership between Seattle Children’s Theatre and Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre. Dulce was the first play Ramón ever wrote, though it has never been produced. He is grateful for the opportunity to revisit this deeply personal work, and to share it with young audiences and families in Austin.

Hielo by Dania Ramos

It is spring 2017 in Cayey, Puerto Rico. When Lucia’s hours at the local superstore are cut back, she decides it’s time to follow her dream of starting a homemade flavored-ice business. She enlists the help of her book-smart teenaged daughter, Alondra, and her resourceful best friend, Yamilet, but things heat up when the neighborhood piragüero feels that his livelihood is threatened. Lucia must consider what’s best for her neighborhood, her daughter, and herself.

Dania Ramos‘s stage plays have been produced or developed by Dreamcatcher Repertory Theatre, Luna Stage, Writers Theatre of New Jersey, Speranza Theatre Company, and Repertorio Español. She has been a finalist in the MetLife Nuestras Voces National Playwriting Competition, the recipient of a New Jersey State Council on the Arts Playwriting Fellowship, and placed third in the 2017 Henley Rose Playwright Competition. Dania holds an MA in creative writing from Wilkes University and a BFA in theatre performance from Montclair State University.

This project is in collaboration with ScriptWorks, and is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Commission on the Arts, and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures.

 

Conference Registration now available for Latina/o Studies in DC

We are happy to announce that the portal for Conference Registration and Membership is now open! The portal can be found here: https://lsa.secure-platform.com/a/

Please note the following:
– Conference Registration and Membership dues may be paid online using PayPal. You may also pay via check; instructions for paying by check are within the portal.

– The Early Conference Registration term is before and no later than on June 1, 2018; the Late Conference Registration term is on and/or after June 2, 2018 and onsite, during the conference.

– All conference participants must be paid members by June 1, 2018. Failure to pay membership dues by June 1, 2018 will result in your not being listed in the program.

¡We look forward to seeing everyone at Latinx Studies Now: DC 2018 + !

The Executive Officers,
The Latina/o Studies Association

 

Register here: https://lsa.secure-platform.com/a/

César Chávez Fellowships at Dartmouth

César Chávez Fellowships

The César Chávez Fellowships support scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. The Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers. We invite applications for both a predoctoral dissertation fellowship and a postdoctoral fellowship.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ PREDOCTORAL DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Dissertation Fellowship. The fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a two-year residential fellowship. Fellows are expected to complete the dissertation before the second year and then transition to a postdoctoral appointment. Throughout, fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the department and the college. During the second year of residency, fellows teach one course. The first year, fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $36,000 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses; as a postdoctoral fellow in the second year, the stipend is approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-20 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your motivations to join a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the dissertation advisor and address the projected timeline for completion.

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47327

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Postdoctoral Fellowship. The Fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a one-year residential fellowship, with one course to be taught in Winter or Spring Quarter. Fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the LALACS program and the college. Fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-19 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your interests in joining a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation. For ABD candidates, at least one of the letters should explicitly address the timeline for dissertation completion. Fellows are expected to have a PhD in hand at the time of appointment (usually by July 1, 2018).

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47328

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CfP: XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures @ UT Austin

XXIII Graduate Colloquium of Iberian and Latin American Languages and Cultures

Call For Papers
Transcending Categories in the Hispanic/Latinx World

The graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin are pleased to announce the XXIII Graduate Colloquium to be held on March 30- 31st, 2018. This colloquium will examine the dialogue and discourse of crossing and the intersection of subjectivities across underrepresented groups in the Hispanic/Latinx world.

At its broadest this colloquium asks: Who are we/they? How does one become constituted as a we or a they? How does an “I” intersect with an “Other”? And how do the various subjectivities within an “I” or a “we” intersect culturally and linguistically? What part does language play in these crossing of socially constructed categories? In recent years, the fields of gender, race, sexuality, disability, and indigeniety have proposed an array of theories to contend with these questions. We invite collaborators to delve into, explore and build upon the latest theorizations on these topics from a plurality of perspectives. Papers on literature, linguistics, cultural studies and interdisciplinary work are all welcome. Presentations may be given in Spanish, Portuguese or English.

Topics may include but are not limited to:
– Identity, Subjectivities, and Assemblage Theory
– Race, Gender, Sexuality, and Dis/ability,
– Colonial history, Indigeneity, and critical race theory
– Transnationalism, borders, and immigration
– Literature, Film, Music, New Media
– Visual, Sound and Performance Studies
– Geographic, Political, and Spatial Configurations- Pedagogy, Education, Technology
– Languages across cultures

Deadline and Proposal Guidelines: Submit an abstract of up to 300 words by December 30, 2017 to utspcolloquium2018@gmail.com Include your name, “Conference Proposal” and either “Linguistics,” “Hispanic,” or “LusoBrazilian” in the message subject line. Please attach two documents, one with your name, affiliation, e-mail address and title of presentation, and a second document with title and abstract only as a .pdf or MS word file.

New Book: Latin Numbers by Brian Eugenio Herrera

Latin Numbers: Playing Latino in Twentieth-Century U.S. Popular Performance (University of Michigan Press, 2015) Brian Eugenio Herrera examines the way in which Latina/o actors have communicated and influenced ideas about race and ethnicity in the U.S. through their performances on the stage and screen. Introducing the concept of the “Latin number,” Dr. Herrera analyzes a series of overlapping historical moments from 1930 to 1990 when media and audiences became fascinated with Latinas/os and their potential impact on U.S. society. As a fleeting phenomenon, in which the U.S. public rediscovers, consumes, and then disregards Latinas/os, “Latin numbers,” Herrera explains, comprise a form of “spectacular entertainment” that perpetuates the myth of Hispanics as perennial novelties. Building on the work of cultural historians, Herrera also employs the concept of “playing Latino” to describe the more enduring effects of Latina/o popular performance on U.S. systems of racial classification and knowledge production. Through detailed case studies, Herrera analyzes the ways in which Latinas/os have been typecast and stereotyped to “closet” or obscure ethnic, cultural, and regional distinctions among Hispanics, while simultaneously racializing them as non-white. Together, Herrera argues that the “Latin number” and “playing Latino” work in tandem to highlight the centrality of popular performance in rehearsing American audiences to think of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans in the more simplistic and monolithic terms of “Latino” and “Hispanic.”

 

Original post by David-James Gonzales found here: http://newbooksnetwork.com/brian-eugenio-herrera-latin-numbers-playing-latino-in-twentieth-century-u-s-popular-performance-u-michigan-press-2015/

Database of Latino Book Presses in the U.S.

In an effort to promote and expose contemporary Latin American literature, it is important to recognize the book presses that focus on publishing Latino literature. The following is an ongoing list that will function as a growing database of Latino book presses in the U.S. We ask the general public to help Latino Book Review continue building this database by providing the names of Latino presses that should be included on the comment section below. In order to include a book press, we will consider the following criteria: 1) The press must be Latino focused or have a high number of Latino authors, 2) Must be currently active, 3) Must have a website and 4) Must have a minimum of at least 5 books published.

CfP: Staging Difference & Alliance: Latinx, Indigenous, and Beyond (Deadline 6/1)

Carla Della Gatta, University of Southern California
Courtney Elkin Mohler, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Within theatre scholarship that addresses difference based on identity and identification, Latinx and Indigenous theatre and performance remain underrepresented. Over the past two years the field has expanded to include gender and sexuality (as denoted by “Latinx” rather than “Latina/o”). Thoughtful conversations have resulted in the decision to integrate Indigenous theatre into the conversation with Latinx theatre, such as ATHE’s newly-titled Latino and Indigenous Americas (LIA) Focus Group, which signals not only a change toward broader gender inclusivity, but also reflects upon what kinds of performance traditions and innovations, topics, themes and aesthetics are currently most relevant to the field. This change arises at the same time as the initiatives in the Latinx Theatre Commons, catalyzing the creation of works by Latinx playwrights containing Latinx characters as only a portion of the total characters. This connects to the ongoing issue faced by Indigenous dramatists: the perception of a lack of qualified Native actors and audiences interested in plays with Native themes. The past decade has seen a surge of quality Native-written scripts, and a notable but non-proportional uptick in produced plays by Native American playwrights. To be produced, some Native dramatists seem to be testing the strategy of including more non-Native characters and accepting “non-traditional” or coalitional casting practices. This working session seeks to join these two conversations to determine the commonalities and differences between Latinx and Indigenous theatre, and how each is changing in subject matter, dramaturgy, practice, and performance to reflect a changing understanding of identity in 2017.

The format for the working session will be to obtain abstracts from each participant in order to divide the participants into pairings or two or possibly three. Essays will be placed in a shared Dropbox and pre-circulated with deadlines for review and commentary. Participant-groups will respond with comments to one another’s essay and pose two questions. These questions and reflections will also be sent to the session leaders. The working session will be held in a roundtable format, with participants giving a one-minute summary of the their partner’s paper. After all of the participants and papers have been introduced (fifteen minutes), the conference leaders will guide the larger conversation and ensure that the discussion pertains to all participants’ papers.

The session leaders will determine four discussion categories that will advance the conversation on Latinx and Indigenous theatre (twenty minutes each, for a total of eighty minutes). Of critical importance will be larger questions regarding the nature of identity as reflected in these papers, practical concerns pertaining to the production of Latinx and Indigenous American theatre and performance, the role of the scholar/critic in engaging with Latinx and Indigenous American theatre practitioners, and an assessment of the changing aesthetics, themes, and forms in a genre/genres currently characterized by an ethos of inclusivity.

After each topic has been discussed, the working group will identify next steps in the conversation (ten minutes) and allot time for Q&A with auditors (fifteen minutes). The goals of the working session will be to develop and advance the discourse on the expanding genres of both Latinx and Indigenous theatre. Historically, the playwright’s background informed a categorization as “Latinx theatre” or “Indigenous theatre” as well as generalized ideas about cultural themes. Given the shifting borders of the field and identification in the second decade of the 21st century, such generalizations based on aged notions of identity politics may not hold. Rather, this working group will grapple with how the expanded notions of indigenous/brown/native/mestiza/mized/on-the-border/borderless/gender+ are produce and are reflected in contemporary Latinx and Indigenous performance. The participants’ papers will inform the working session and hone in on the most urgent issues facing these fields. This may include negotiating how language, linguistic code-switching, performance venues, casting, dramaturgy, historiography, and criticism have all informed the delineations between Latinx and Indigenous theatre.

For any specific questions, please contact the working group convenors at dellagat@usc.edu, and comohler@iupui.edu.

Please note that all submissions must be received formally through the ASTR website here. The form will allow you to indicate second and third choice working groups if you wish; if you do so, note that there is a space for you to indicate how your work will fit into those groups. The deadline for receipt of working group proposals is 1 June 2017 and we anticipate that participants will be notified of their acceptance no later than 30 June. Please contact the conference organizers at astr2017@astr.org if you have any questions about the process.