Young Lords Digital Collection

If you’re into activism and don’t know who the Young Lords are, this is your chance to make amends. Depaul University has a Young Lords Newspaper collection that is available online. Believe me, it’s worth checking out…

 

http://digicol.lib.depaul.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/younglords

 

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6 College Scholarships Latinos Should Apply to Right Now

Original post by Remezcla found here: http://remezcla.com/lists/culture/college-scholarships-2018-2019-school-year/

 

Between 1993 and 2014, the enrollment of Latinos in college rose substantially. In 1993, only 22 percent of Latinos aged 18 to 24 attended either a two- or four-year college, according to Pew. By 2014, with about 2.3 million Latino students, the number jumped to 35 percent. And while enrollment for Latinos continues to grow, the cost of higher education can still prevent some from attending college – or it may push others into taking on onerous loans.

Though the spring semester has just begun, it’s never too early to start thinking about summer and fall. That’s why we put together a list of scholarships meant to provide some relief for Latino students. Jot down these deadlines on your calendar.

Anhelo Project Dream Scholarship ApplicationDeadline: January 26, 2018

The Anhelo Project is for undocumented students in Illinois. “Our goal is to support undocumented students, many of whom despite growing up in the United States and earning a high school diploma, continuously face challenging roadblocks when pursuing a post-secondary education. One major obstacle being financial need due to ineligibility to apply for federal and state financial aid.”

 

Learn more and apply here.

AMS Minority ScholarshipsDeadline: February 1, 2018

The AMS Minority Scholarship awards students who “have been traditionally underrepresented in the sciences, especially Hispanic, Native American, and Black/African American students.” The two-year scholarship provides students with $3,000 for their freshmen year and $3,000 for their sophomore year.

Learn more and apply here.

National Association of Hispanic JournalistsDeadline: February 15

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) will offer five different scholarships in 2018 ranging between $1,500 and $5,000. “NAHJ scholarship opportunities are open to college-bound high school seniors, college undergraduates, and graduate students pursuing careers in English or Spanish-language print, broadcast, digital, or photojournalism. ”

Learn more and apply here.

ACS Scholars ProgramDeadline: March 1, 2018

The ACS Scholars Program awards students who are Latino, African American, or American Indian. It’s open to students (high school seniors, college freshmen, sophomores, or juniors) who plan to or are majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, or another chemical science field.

Learn more and apply here.

Actuarial Diversity ScholarshipDeadline: March 1, 2018

The Actuarial Diversity Scholarship offers an annual scholarship for African American/Black, Latino, Native American, and Pacific Islander students interested in the actuarial profession. The amount awarded varies, with high school seniors receiving $1,000, sophomores $2,000, juniors $3,000 and seniors $4,000.

Learn more and apply here.

Hispanic Scholarship FundDeadline: March 30

The Hispanic Scholarship Fund has one goal: to “assist students of Hispanic heritage obtain a college degree.” The scholarship is open to high school seniors, undergrads, students transferring from community college to four-year universities, and graduate students. The 2018-2019 scholarships vary between $500 and $5,000.

Learn more and apply here.

César Chávez Fellowships at Dartmouth

César Chávez Fellowships

The César Chávez Fellowships support scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. The Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers. We invite applications for both a predoctoral dissertation fellowship and a postdoctoral fellowship.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ PREDOCTORAL DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Dissertation Fellowship. The fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a two-year residential fellowship. Fellows are expected to complete the dissertation before the second year and then transition to a postdoctoral appointment. Throughout, fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the department and the college. During the second year of residency, fellows teach one course. The first year, fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $36,000 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses; as a postdoctoral fellow in the second year, the stipend is approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-20 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your motivations to join a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation, one of which must be from the dissertation advisor and address the projected timeline for completion.

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47327

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CÉSAR CHÁVEZ POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Dartmouth College invites applications for the César Chávez Postdoctoral Fellowship. The Fellowship supports scholars whose research addresses aspects of Latinx experience and culture. Particular attention will be given to candidates whose work augments and complements current faculty in Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies (LALACS). Applicants will be selected on the basis of their academic achievement, promise in both research and teaching, and their demonstrated commitment to educational diversity. Applications from candidates who are underrepresented in their fields are especially welcome.

This is a one-year residential fellowship, with one course to be taught in Winter or Spring Quarter. Fellows are expected to pursue research activities while participating fully in the intellectual life of the LALACS program and the college. Fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $55,200 plus benefits and an allocation for research expenses (exact funding levels for 2018-19 will be set at the time of offer).

Chávez Fellows are part of a multidisciplinary cohort of approximately ten predoctoral and postdoctoral scholars, all committed to increasing diversity in their disciplines. Fellows participate together in mentoring and professional development programming, including guidance in preparing for faculty careers.

APPLICATION MATERIALS

  1. Research statement outlining completed research (including dissertation), work in progress, and plans for publication (maximum two pages single spaced);
  2. Teaching statement outlining past and future teaching interests (maximum one page single spaced)
  3. Fellowship program statement describing your interests in joining a multidisciplinary cohort; the statement should also describe prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and/or service (maximum one page single spaced)
  4. Curriculum vitae
  5. Three confidential letters of recommendation. For ABD candidates, at least one of the letters should explicitly address the timeline for dissertation completion. Fellows are expected to have a PhD in hand at the time of appointment (usually by July 1, 2018).

Application through Interfolio can be accessed here: http://apply.interfolio.com/47328

Review of applications will begin February 18, 2018 and continue until the position is filled.

Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. We prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, disability, veteran status, marital status, or any other legally protected status. Applications by members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged.

CLIR Postdoc at UNM

Any postdocs out there?

University of New Mexico
CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

The University of New Mexico seeks applications for a two-year CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation and Latin American, Chicano and Caribbean Studies. The fellow will help bridge gaps in the North/South information divide as part of the faculty in the College of University Libraries and Learning Sciences (CULLS), with an affiliated status at the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII). In the libraries, the successful fellow will collaborate with Research Data Services (RDS), Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communication (DISC), and Latin American Collections to enhance and build upon existing custodial and post-custodial collections projects that bridge the North/South information gap in historical and contemporary contexts. Well-developed United States/Latin America partnerships in all affiliated programs offer a firm foundation for the successful fellow to develop new initiatives that enhance collections and scholarship while  implementing  equitable  and  culturally  sensitive  Latin American and Caribbean projects in data curation and digital humanities. This fellowship offers a distinctive opportunity to work across geographic boundaries and academic disciplines at a historically and culturally diverse, flagship university, which is National Resource Center for Latin America (Title VI NRC) as well as a Carnegie Classified “Highest Research Activity” and Hispanic-Serving Institution.

The successful fellow will work with digitized and born digital documents, data and metadata and a wide variety of historical texts, including: maps, personal and professional correspondence, political and legal records and accounting, travel and shipping logs. New Mexico’s history as part of the Spanish colonial empire, independent Mexico and the United States enables the fellow to traverse the changing political boundaries of the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean while investigating and improving online access to collections, data and metadata between the Americas. UNM presents excellent opportunities to work on several projects involving data curation in Latin American, Chicano and Caribbean Studies, ranging from interactive digital bibliography development, mapping and social network analysis to cross cultural data and meta-data translation and enhancement.  The successful fellow will have ample opportunity to conduct original research on data curation strategies in Latin American and Latin Americanist contexts. A strong emphasis on the ways that the fellow can contribute to data curation and post-custodial partnerships at UNM and beyond will be matched by the professional development of the fellow in the fields of Latin American, Chicano and Caribbean Studies, library science, data curation, and the digital humanities.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Use a variety of contemporary research methods and tools to analyze, consult and instruct diverse communities on Latin American, Chicano and Caribbean documents, data and metadata in digitalized and born-digital environments
  • Work with community stake holders to develop educational material and web resources
  • Collaborate with  Latin  American  partner  institutions  to  develop  digitally-augmented materials from Latin American archival and data sources
  • Participate in professional organizations and maintain awareness of the developing trends in digital humanities, data curation and digital scholarship, Latin American librarianship and Latin American and Chicano and Caribbean Studies
  • Assist in the development of policies and procedures for digitally-born acquisitions, metadata translations, data curation, and management
  • Provide training for students, faculty, staff, and international partners on best practices and standards that bridge North/South information gap
  • Collaborate in grant writing to support digital initiatives and scholarly communications across borders
  • Work with library departments, technical experts, and community partners to enhance access to Latin American and Caribbean data

QUALIFICATIONS

Required:

  • Ph.D. completed within the last five years in a relevant field
  • Reading and writing knowledge of Spanish
  • Ability to work effectively with diverse populations and in interdisciplinary environments

Desired:

  • Familiarity with or desire to learn HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and Drupal
  • Familiarity with or desire to learn GIS data and mapping tools, and social networking technologies and international data curation practices
  • Demonstrated understanding of North/South issues in libraries, archives and the internet
  • Experience with or demonstrated aptitude for digital humanities technologies, tools and methods to organize and make discoverable digital surrogates and digitally-born data
  • Ability to work with a wide range of individuals to identify key problems and contribute to teams that develop solutions
  • Demonstrated knowledge of digital audio and/or video formats
  • Experience with metadata standards and/or RDF/Linked Data
  • Scholarly focus on topics in Latin American, Chicano or Caribbean Studies
  • Demonstrated excellence in reading, writing, and speaking Spanish
  • Experience with or demonstrated knowledge of digital platforms across the Americas

GUIDANCE AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Training in Research Data Services (RDS), Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communications (DISC), and Latin American Collections in the libraries
  • Collaborative opportunities with interdisciplinary scholars in UNM’s Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) working groups
  • Collaborative working relationships with  local  organizations  such  as  the  National Hispanic Cultural Center and the New Mexico Humanities Council
  • Opportunities to work with staff who have a variety of technical and domain-specific skill sets
  • Access to technology support and consultation services from CULLS IT staff members which maintains the Libraries’ technical infrastructure
  • Participation in the intellectual life of the CULLS and the LAII, including speaker’s series, symposia, and workshops
  • Option of co-teaching  in  Latin  American  Studies  or  Organizational  Learning and Information Sciences
  • Membership in a vibrant community of Latin Americanists and Chicano scholars and artists
  • Networking and research opportunities with Latin American partner institutions

COMPENSATION
The salary for this position is $65,000 with benefits including: medical, dental, vision, and life insurance; FSA; 403(b) and 457(b) eligibility; and discounts for UNM Athletic and Popejoy events, and local businesses that are part of the LoboPerks program.

ENVIRONMENT

The University of New Mexico is located in Albuquerque, the 60th largest metropolitan area in the US. Set between the scenic Sandia Mountains and the Rio Grande, Albuquerque is home to diverse cultures, a vibrant arts scene, sporting events, fantastic local cuisine and easy access to myriad recreational opportunities. The College of University Libraries and Learning Sciences at UNM is a member of the Association of Research Libraries, the Greater Western Library Alliance, and the New Mexico Consortium of Academic Libraries.  The LAII is an NRC for Latin America.

Latin American collections include nearly 850,000 print and electronic books  in English, Spanish, Portuguese and indigenous languages. Supporting research across all UNM colleges, these comprehensive holdings also include 13,000 digitized archival pieces, 5000 repository manuscripts, and sizable archival collections in the Center for Southwest Research and Special Collections. The following post-custodial collections make shared materials openly accessible through UNM platforms: Fideicomiso Archivo Plutarco Elias Calles y Fernando Torreblanca (FAPECFT), Hemispheric Research  Institute  (HEMI),  Spanish  Colonial  Research  Center (SCRC), Abya Yala and the Latin American Energy Policy, Regulation and Dialogue (LaEnergaia).

UNM’s RDS program works with diverse disciplines across UNM in the planning for and management, analysis, documentation, preservation, and sharing of research data through UNM’s Digital Repository (http://digitalrepository.unm.edu/data/), and through other disciplinary repositories. Examples of these data include environmental and ecological data from large-scale research programs, Spanish and indigenous language data and applications, and spatially enhanced document collections.

The University Libraries’ Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communication (DISC) program develops online resources that promote access to, strengthen the awareness of and digitally preserve  the  cultural  heritage  of  New  Mexico  and  the  greater  Southwest.  The  University Libraries also operate an independent IT services unit that provides comprehensive technology support for all library online initiatives, and maintains an enterprise-class virtual server environment, extensive data storage facilities, and active collaborations with the UNM Center for Advanced Research Computing.

The LAII is designated a National Resource Center (NRC) for Latin America by the US Department of Education. It promotes greater understanding of Latin America and Iberia within and beyond UNM. LAII coordinates and supports the Latin American work of some 119 faculty with research and teaching specializations representing nine colleges at UNM. LAII provides a range of support services, including conference and research travel, funding for visiting speakers, interdisciplinary research working groups, and seed funding for external grant applications. In collaboration with UNM’s Global Education Office, LAII assists in negotiating and maintaining inter-institutional agreements abroad. In addition to offering interdisciplinary Latin American Studies BA, MA and PhD degrees, LAII collaborates on multiple dual degree programs with professional schools.

CfP: Critical Feminist Exits, Re-Routings, and Institutional Betrayals in Academia

“Critical Feminist Exits, Re-Routings, and Institutional Betrayals in Academia”

a Special Issue of Feminist Formations

Full papers due February 15, 2018

Edited by Marta Maria Maldonado and Katja M. Guenther

While universities often identify diversity as an important concern and goal, the neo-liberalization of academic contexts has in many ways fostered the entrenchment and rearticulation of hegemonic racial and gendered ideologies and practices. As a result, critical scholars often face institutional environments that are hostile and/or unresponsive to their concerns and perspectives, and broadly speaking, to issues critical to women, LGBITQ people, people of color, and other marginalized groups. Scholars who experience discrimination, bullying, harassment, and/or hostile work environments may find themselves relocated, either by “choice” or as an outcome of administrative processes.

This special issue focuses on the politics of the movement of critical feminist scholars—those who routinely challenge racialized, gendered, ableist, heteronormative or homophobic, and/or first-worldist scripts within their fields or departments, through their embodied presence and their substantive work. We invite manuscripts that map out and examine scholars’ movements within, across, and out of academic institutions.

Of interest also are analyses of how administrators and academic institutions initiate, negotiate, and/or respond to moves and exits by critical scholars. We seek thoughtful examination of institutional failures to support critical feminist scholars, analysis of the consequences of such failures, as well as discussion of administrative responses that embrace and support critical feminist scholars and their work, as a way to identify transformative possibilities.

The fact that critical feminist scholars move within, across (and sometimes out of) academic institutions is not new. It is also not unique, as scholars whose work is not particularly feminist or critical move and exit academic units and institutions routinely. The premise that motivates this special issue, however, is that there are particular institutional and structural constraints and conditions which impel the moves and exits of critical scholars, especially of those who occupy marginalized social locations through their embodiment of non-dominant ethnoracial and gendered characteristics, identities, and histories. Also, the consequences of moves and exits are likely to be different for critical scholars from marginalized social locations than for “mainstream” scholars occupying dominant social locations. For example, given dominant ideologies of gender, sexuality, and race in academic contexts, the actions and rationales of scholars from marginalized social locations are likely to be coded or interpreted negatively, and even dismissed, with repercussions for the racialized and gendered academic enterprise of knowledge production.

The Guest Editors encourage submission of manuscripts that sustain and advance critical, systemic reflection on and analysis of the following (and related) questions:

• What factors drive the exit/movement of critical feminist scholars from one department/unit/institution to another? What kinds of marginalization and epistemic and/or political friction prompt such moves?
• Are there disciplinary/academic sites that routinely expunge critical feminist scholars or fail to stop them from leaving? What are the various types of receiving sites?
• What kinds of issues within “critical academic units” like Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or Ethnic Studies cause critical feminist scholars to leave them? What role do differing understandings of equity and social justice play in such moves?
• To what extent are several types of moves understood as voluntary or as a matter of “personal choice?” Who gets to make choices, and under which constraints?
• What is revealed when we shift focus from individual to collective exits and moves? To what extent can we think of critical feminist exoduses, or even exiles? What does it mean to consider those who have not necessarily chosen to exit particular contexts, but who have been effectively banished, displaced, removed, dispossessed, disappeared, or exiled from particular spaces, or from the academy more broadly? Who replaces those who leave (or are forced to leave)?
• What are the implications of the exits of critical feminist scholars for feminist practice and institutional transformation?
• How do critical feminist scholars negotiate exits in different types of institutions (e.g., research university, 4-year teaching college, community college, research institute, etc.)?
• Are opportunities and limitations for critical feminist scholars similar across national contexts? Do administrative responses vary across nations?
• What propels some critical feminist scholars outside of academia altogether?
• How does the movement of critical feminist scholars vary across career levels (grad students, ladder- rank, contingent faculty) and what are the implications at different levels?
• How are exits and re-routings managed, justified, and understood/explained by the scholar who moves, the sending unit, the receiving unit, and by administrators?
• What happens after a move? How do relocated faculty discover and negotiate the constraints that unfold as they confront sexist/ableist/racist/settler/class/sexuality hegemonies within the receiving department?
• What are the (positive or negative) consequences of critical exits for individual faculty, departments, campuses (including students), and disciplines? Do such exits influence how interdisciplinarity is understood and valued? How does the social location of the exiting scholar shape the consequences of moving?
• What lessons accrue for universities and administrators who care about equity, inclusion, diverse knowledges, social justice? What types of interventions are effective at addressing the negative drivers and consequences of critical academic migrations? What does a critical feminist agenda regarding such movements look like?

We welcome submissions from scholars across disciplines, as well as analyses that draw on personal experience with critical feminist exits.

Papers should be submitted on our Submittable page directly.

Manuscripts must be submitted by February 15, 2018.

Author(s) should provide all identifying information, including name, title, institutional affiliation, address, phone numbers, and email. Following the deadline, guest editors will review the manuscripts and determine those to be sent for full review.

Manuscripts will be subject to anonymous peer review and must adhere to the publishing guidelines of Feminist Formations, available at www.feministformations.org where there is a style guide, submission checklist, anonymization guide, and a sample article. Questions about the submission process may be sent to Editorial assistants Andrés López and LK Mae at feministformations@oregonstate.edu

Inquiries to the co-editors in advance of submission are welcome: Marta Maria Maldonado marta.maldonado@oregonstate.edu and Katja M. Guenther katja@ucr.edu.

Feminist Formations is a leading journal of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, published three times a year by the Johns Hopkins University Press. It is housed in the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at Oregon State University, under the editorship of Patti Duncan. For more information, see www.feministformations.org.

Fellowship in Afro-Latinidades in the United States

For original post, go here: https://latino-studies.williams.edu/articles/fellowship-in-afro-latinidades-in-the-united-states/

The Program in Latina and Latino Studies at Williams College invites applications for a two-year pre-doctoral fellowship or a one-year post-doctoral fellowship in Afro-Latina/o/x Studies beginning in the fall semester of 2018. The program seeks a scholar of Afro-Latinidades in the United States whose research and teaching embraces and advances interdisciplinary approaches rooted in the humanities and/or social sciences, including but not limited to literary and visual studies and criticism; performance studies; social movements and activism; and/or studies of social and structural inequalities.

A successful pre-doctoral fellow candidate will devote the first year to the completion of dissertation work while also teaching one course in the study of U.S. Afro-Latinidades. The second year of residency (ideally with degree in hand) will be spent on academic career development while again teaching one course. A successful post-doctoral fellow candidate will dedicate the year to their current research and teach one course each semester in the study of U.S. Afro-Latinidades. The Latina and Latino Studies Program has demonstrated success in mentoring and supporting pre- and post-doctoral fellows, and we are especially interested in candidates from under-represented groups as well as individuals who have experience in working with diverse student populations. Information about the program can be found at https://latino-studies.williams.edu/

All applicants should send the following materials to the program chair, Mérida M. Rúa, via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/43605 : a cover letter detailing their research and teaching interests; a C.V.; and three letters of recommendation. Pre-doctoral fellowship applicants should send a copy of the dissertation prospectus, preferably limited to 10-15 pages and a timetable for completion of the degree. Postdoctoral applicants should submit a writing sample, preferably limited to 25 pages.

Review of applications will begin on December 15, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled. All offers of employment are contingent on the completion of a background check. Further information is available at: http://dean-faculty.williams.edu/prospective-faculty/background-check-policy/.

Williams is a coeducational liberal arts college located in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts. The college has built its reputation on the teaching and scholarship of its faculty and on the academic excellence of its approximately 2000 students. Please visit the Williams website (http://williams.edu). Beyond meeting fully its legal obligations for non-discrimination, Williams is committed to building a diverse and inclusive community where members from all backgrounds can live, learn, and thrive together.

Academic of the Year: Cristina Rivera Garza

Despite all of the social and political turmoil our country is facing, it is important to take time and celebrate some of the great accomplishments achieved within our community. One of these remarkable and historical moments will occur this Fall 2017 at the University of Houston. For the first time in our nation’s history, we will have a Ph.D. program in Spanish with a concentration in Creative Writing.
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The University of Houston seems to be the perfect place for this initiative for its long tradition in Latino literature. Other national projects housed at the University of Houston are Arte Público Press and Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage program, which have also proven to be crucial in the promotion of Latino literature and research in the U.S. for several decades. These literary projects as well as the new Ph.D. Creative Writing program makes the University of Houston one of the most highly regarded institutions within our Latino literary community.
This groundbreaking initiative will be led by no other than the renown, award winning Mexican author, Cristina Rivera Garza. With well over 40 million Spanish speakers in this country, this initiative is not only a huge step forward, but without a doubt, one of the greatest academic Latino achievements of the decade. For this reason, Latino Book Review is proud to name Cristina Rivera Garza, Academic of the Year; for her pioneering spirit in academics and assistance in the advancement of the Spanish language in the U.S.
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This Ph.D. program not only validates Spanish Creative Writing within the U.S., but it’s also a promising cornerstone that seeks to inspire other universities throughout the country to do the same. It is a symbol of empowerment for those who choose to share stories in our beautiful mother tongue.