Latinx: The Future is Now series…

This looks awesome. Can’t wait to see some of the publications that come out of this!

https://utpressnews.blogspot.com/2019/04/announcing-new-serieslatinx-future-is.html?fbclid=IwAR3d5gKu0TnZfPRLceJmwefRryKka5adSvYNoCV5UGEjyWIxft7_qGQqvek

Announcing a New Series—Latinx: The Future is Now

Latinx: The Future Is Now is a new interdisciplinary series devoted to the evolving field of Latina/o/x studies, including Central American, Afro-Latinx, and Asian-Latinx studies. Situated at the nexus of cultural, performance, historical, food, environmental, and textual studies, the series will focus on ways in which the racial, cultural, and social formations of historical Latinx communities can engage and enhance scholarship across geographies and nationalities. The series editors invite projects that consider the multiple queer and gender-fluid possibilities that are embodied in the “x”; projects that have a feminist critique of patriarchy at the center of their intellectual work; projects that deploy a relational approach to ethnic and national groups; and projects that address the overlapping dynamics of gender, race, sexual, and national identities.

Submissions or queries may be directed to the series editors, Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez, ngh24@austin.utexas.edu and Lorgia Garcia-Peña, garciapena@fas.harvard.edu in addition to Senior Acquisitions Editor, Kerry Webb, kwebb@utpress.utexas.edu.

Forthcoming books in the series will be listed here as they are published: https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/series/latinx-future-now.

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Dr. Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández is Associate Professor of American Studies and Mexican American and Latina/o Studies. She is an expert in Borderlands History after 1846, Transnational Feminist Methodologies, Latinx Studies, and Popular Culture and Immigration. As a public intellectual, Dr. Guidotti-Hernández has written numerous articles for the feminist magazine Ms. and the feminist blog The Feminist Wire, covering such topics as immigration, reproductive rights, and the Dream act. She also sits on the national advisory council for the Ms. and is currently on the national advisory council for Freedom University in Athens, Georgia.

Dr. Lorgia Garcia-Peña is the Roy G. Clouse Associate Professor of Latinx Studies at Harvard University. She is the author of  award-winning book The Borders of Dominicanidad and the co-founder of Freedom University Georgia, a modern-day freedom school created to support undocumented students.

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Alicia Gaspar de Alba in Austin on May 2nd

https://events.attend.com/f/1383788945#/reg/0/   RSVP here – seats are limited!

 

“This is about resistance:” The Feminist Revisions of Alicia Gaspar de Alba

Thursday, May 2, 2019, 4:00pm – 6:00pm

The University of Texas Libraries, The Center for Mexican American Studies, the Center for Women and Gender Studies, and LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections invite you to commemorate the acquisition of the Alicia Gaspar de Alba papers. The multifaceted Chicana queer feminist scholar will be reading from her works and discussing her career with MALS lecturer and community organizer Lilia Rosas. Archival viewing and reception to follow remarks. 

New Book: El Norte by Carrie Gibson

https://groveatlantic.com/book/el-norte/

About the Book

Because of our shared English language, as well as the celebrated origin tales of the Mayflowerand the rebellion of the British colonies, the United States has prized its Anglo heritage above all others. However, as Carrie Gibson explains with great depth and clarity in El Norte, the nation has much older Spanish roots—ones that have long been unacknowledged or marginalized. The Hispanic past of the United States predates the arrival of the Pilgrims by a century, and has been every bit as important in shaping the nation as it exists today.

El Norte chronicles the sweeping and dramatic history of Hispanic North America from the arrival of the Spanish in the early 16th century to the present—from Ponce de Leon’s initial landing in Florida in 1513 to Spanish control of the vast Louisiana territory in 1762 to the Mexican-American War in 1846 and up to the more recent tragedy of post-hurricane Puerto Rico and the ongoing border acrimony with Mexico. Interwoven in this stirring narrative of events and people are cultural issues that have been there from the start but which are unresolved to this day: language, belonging, community, race, and nationality. Seeing them play out over centuries provides vital perspective at a time when it is urgently needed.

In 1883, Walt Whitman meditated on his country’s Spanish past: “We Americans have yet to really learn our own antecedents, and sort them, to unify them,” predicting that “to that composite American identity of the future, Spanish character will supply some of the most needed parts.” That future is here, and El Norte, a stirring and eventful history in its own right, will make a powerful impact on our national understanding.

New Book: Latinx Literature Now Between Evanescence and Event

Latinx Literature Now engages with a diverse collection of works in Latinx literary studies, critical theory, and the philosophy of history, as well as a wide range of Latinx literary texts, in order to offer readers an alternative model of how Latinx literary scholarship and Latinx literary criticism might go about doing their work. It encourages practitioners in the field to reflect on literature and latinidad together as both parallel and intersecting historical-cultural formations, and to assess from that reflection how literary works might uniquely condition and depict latinidad as something other than a fixed, stable category of identity, as instead an ongoing process of becoming, one always capable of promise, but also always vulnerable to risk, threat, precarity and even disappearance: that is, as always more prone to the performative flash of an evanescence than to the ontological solidity of an event.

 

About the author: Ricardo L. Ortiz is Associate Professor of Latinx Literature and Culture at Georgetown University, USA.

With A New Book, Louie Pérez Of Los Lobos Is Master Storyteller

Check out this NPR article by Felix Contreras and Marisa Arbona-Ruiz. If you go to the site, you can even here an interview: https://www.npr.org/sections/altlatino/2019/01/18/686408433/with-a-new-book-louie-perez-of-los-lobos-is-master-storyteller

 

“There is no such thing as Chicano hippies! And playing Mexican music??”

That was my father’s reaction when I described seeing five honest-to-goodness Chicano hippies with beards and ponytails playing mariachi music at a Chicano student leadership retreat at UC Davis in 1975. Los Lobos del Este de Los Angeles, the group called themselves.

Three years later, there was a bright yellow album cover with a drawing of a nopal plant and an inlay photo of those very same Chicano hippies that proclaimed themselves as ‘Just Another Band from East LA.’ They were still playing Mexican folk music and that record was a staple of Chicano activist parties during my college years in Fresno, Calif.

Then, nothing. For five years. Until they came roaring out of the LA punk scene with electric instruments turned up to 11 rocking corridos, a Ritchie Valens song and the first three originals by David Hidalgo and Louie Perez, a song writing team that would redefine Chicano musical expression and win legions of fans around the world.

Good Morning, Aztlán : The Words, Pictures and Songs of Louie Pérez (published by Tia Chucha Press) has just been published and it is a breathtaking examination of Pérez ‘s masterful storytelling in the name of sharing the lesson that we have more in common than we are different.

This week, Pérez sits down for a wide-ranging interview about the book, his own story, his creative bond with David Hidalgo that stretches back to the 11th grade and his commitment to telling the stories of the world as he has seen it from countless tour buses.

Good Morning, Aztlán has songs as well as short stories, poetry and philosophical riffs all written by Pérez and we selected a few to include in the show. Big thanks to Alt.Latino contributor Marisa Arbona-Ruiz‘s multi-talented acting skills for the dramatic readings on the show this week. Get your tissues out for her reading of “Little John Of God” one of Pérez ‘s most powerfully emotional songs.

With David Hidalgo as his writing partner and the rest of Los Lobos as the vehicle that brings those stories to life, Louie Pérez has created an imaginary world full of real life joys and pains and wonder that seems worlds away from the hippie mariachi I saw. But the through line going back to 8-year-old Louie Pérez of East LA has been his fascination with the written word. And we all have benefited from that.

Tia Chucha’s online bookstore

SA’s International Latina Feminist Zine ‘St. Sucia’ Celebrates Final Issue

Check out the original article by Sam Sanchez here…

https://outinsa.com/sas-international-latina-feminist-zine-st-sucia-celebrates-final-issue/?fbclid=IwAR29d_49Vo2ElZ-ghCARlKcI_-7rff0QC414ktN8DN1O8l5lc3PcnUZPTjw

St. Sucia, the international Latina feminist zine that originated in San Antonio in 2014, will be celebrating the publication of its 14th and final issue on January 5 at Hitones.

During the last four years, St. Sucia’s art director Isabel Ann Castro and editor Natasha Hernandez have distinguished themselves by creating a widely-praised publication with submissions from around the globe.

On the magazine’s website, its creators explain to potential contributors: “Our goal is to share our stories, including the ones from mujeres who don’t consider themselves writers, artists, or poets. We want to share the stories we don’t tell, but other mujeres need to hear. We want to encourage other mujeres to express themselves. We are a space for gente who identify as mujer, in any way they choose to. Mujer is queer, mujer is straight, it’s political, it’s flaca, it’s gordita, it’s a grito, it’s a mouthed curse, it’s a walk alone at night. Mujer is a million things and so are you. Tell us about it.”

Castro and Hernandez told the San Antonio Current that ending the zine’s run was “a decision they reached after long consideration to pursue other creative projects, such as independent zines, comics and a web series they plan to launch with the help of other San Antonio artists, including musician Alyson Alonzo.”

The work has paid off. St. Sucia is available in university libraries around the country and is on syllabi for courses on Chicano/a Studies, Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, Latino Contemporary Literature and has been the subject of academic study and theses. It can also be found in university archives including the international Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection.

Looking toward the future, Castro and Hernandez are planning workshops, organizing events like the San Anto Zine Fest and guest lecturing at universities across the U.S.

Still, parting is sweet sorrow. “I’m really sad,” Hernandez told the Current. “It’s been a part of my identity for a while.”

 

New Book: Chicano and Chicana Art: A Critical Anthology

Description

This anthology provides an overview of the history and theory of Chicano/a art from the 1960s to the present, emphasizing the debates and vocabularies that have played key roles in its conceptualization. In Chicano and Chicana Art—which includes many of Chicano/a art’s landmark and foundational texts and manifestos—artists, curators, and cultural critics trace the development of Chicano/a art from its early role in the Chicano civil rights movement to its mainstream acceptance in American art institutions. Throughout this teaching-oriented volume they address a number of themes, including the politics of border life, public art practices such as posters and murals, and feminist and queer artists’ figurations of Chicano/a bodies. They also chart the multiple cultural and artistic influences—from American graffiti and Mexican pre-Columbian spirituality to pop art and modernism—that have informed Chicano/a art’s practice.

Contributors. Carlos Almaraz, David Avalos, Judith F. Baca, Raye Bemis, Jo-Anne Berelowitz, Elizabeth Blair, Chaz Bojóroquez, Philip Brookman, Mel Casas, C. Ondine Chavoya, Karen Mary Davalos, Rupert García, Alicia Gaspar de Alba, Shifra Goldman, Jennifer A. González, Rita Gonzalez, Robb Hernández, Juan Felipe Herrera, Louis Hock, Nancy L. Kelker, Philip Kennicott, Josh Kun, Asta Kuusinen, Gilberto “Magu” Luján, Amelia Malagamba-Ansotegui, Amalia Mesa-Bains, Dylan Miner, Malaquias Montoya, Judithe Hernández de Neikrug, Chon Noriega, Joseph Palis, Laura Elisa Pérez, Peter Plagens, Catherine Ramírez, Matthew Reilly, James Rojas, Terezita Romo, Ralph Rugoff, Lezlie Salkowitz-Montoya, Marcos Sanchez-Tranquilino, Cylena Simonds, Elizabeth Sisco, John Tagg, Roberto Tejada, Rubén Trejo, Gabriela Valdivia, Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, Victor Zamudio-Taylor

2018 Best Latino/Latin American History Books

Alejandra Oliva puts out another banger of a 2018 list for Remezcla here: http://remezcla.com/lists/culture/2018-latino-latin-american-history-books/ 

Please note not every book on this list is US Latinx proper.

 

There’s no reason studying and academic books have to stay in school – often, scholars are working on telling stories about fascinating intersections between art, culture, and politics that don’t have “mass-market appeal.” Unfortunately, smaller projected audiences often translate to higher prices, or more niche-academic language, but a good writer and a good scholar will write a text everyone can get into.

Here are some books that tell good stories, or can help you get an overview of topics you care a lot about. We’ve tried to get a little bit of everything: food, music, art, politics. Poke around, order books from your local library, use bibliographies to track down other writers you might also want to be in conversation with, and do a little studying outside of school!

Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture Ed Morales (Verso)

In Latinx, Morales argues for a growing portion of American culture – a gender-neutral term for a cross-national, multi-and-inter-racial group that has so far gone largely unrecognized on the stage of national culture. Latinx provides a history of Latinx people in the United States, and suggests that they might be a key to the future.

Pop América, 1965-1975, Esther Gabara (Duke University Press)

An academic book that doubles as a coffee table tome! A guide to accompany a traveling exhibit of Latin American pop art, this book comes with plenty of colorful images, as well as essays that trace the art movement’s origins across Latin America.

A Library for the Americas: The Nettie Lee Benson Latin America Collection, ed. Julianne Gilliand and Jose Montelongo (University of Texas Press)

UT Austin has one of the best collections of Latin American rare books and artifacts, and this tome will bring them into your home library. Showcasing the treasures of the library in full color, you’ll be able to page through treasures of Latin American history – codexes, paintings, and more.

A Massacre in Mexico: The True Story Behind the Missing Forty-Three Students, Anabel Hernandez, trans. John Washington (Verso)

Since 2014, the murder of 43 Mexican students from Ayotzinapa has been a dark and unsolved mystery that has come to symbolize everything wrong with Mexican politics and corruption. Here, journalist Anabel Hernandez does her best to unravel the mystery behind the massacre, and in the process, shines a harsh and unforgiving light on Mexican politics and government.

Latinx Literature Unbound: Undoing Ethnic Expectation, Ralph E. Rodriguez (Fordham University Press)

The last few years have seen an explosion of Latinx lit, and in this volume, Ralph E. Rodriguez attempts to figure out exactly what that means. What is Latinx lit? What does it mean to have a critical framework surrounding it? Read this for a more meta look at the books you already love.

Cuba: The Cookbook, Madelaine Vázquez Gálvez and Imogene Tondre (Phaidon)

If you’re looking for an absolutely beautiful showstopper of a book on everything to do with Cuban cuisine, this is it. Basically a food showroom (nice to look at and dream about, not always easy or practical to make), this is the kind of cookbook you might sit down and read, cover to cover.

Sounds of Crossing: Music, Migration, and the Aural Poetics of Huapango Arribeño, Alex E. Chavez

Chavez uses the songs of the borderlands to talk about immigration into the US and the culture that has sprung up around the border. He pulls in both history and current situations – and best of all, his own experiences as a Mexican academic and musician – to create a multidimensional, gorgeous book.

New Book: Mexicans in Alaska by Sara V. Komarnisky

You can listen to an interview with the author here: https://newbooksnetwork.com/sara-komarnisky-mexicans-in-alaska-an-ethnography-of-mobility-place-and-transnational-life-u-nebraska-press-2018/

 

“There are Mexicans in Alaska?” This was the response Sara Komarnisky heard repeatedly when describing her research on three generations of transnational migrants who divide their time between Anchorage, Alaska and Acuitzio del Canje, Michoacán, Mexico. In her multi-sited ethnography, Mexicans in Alaska: An Ethnography of Mobility, Place, and Transnational Life (University of Nebraska Press, 2018), Komarnisky explores these migrants’ experiences of mobility—across space and time—and the processes by which they get used to this transnational way of life. This engaging book offers a persuasive case for reimagining how we think about immigration, identity, and national boundaries.

 

More about the book:

Mexicans in Alaska analyzes the mobility and experience of place of three generations of migrants who have been moving between Acuitzio del Canje, Michoacán, Mexico, and Anchorage, Alaska, since the 1950s. Based on Sara V. Komarnisky’s twelve months of ethnographic research at both sites and on more than ten years of engagement with the people in these locations, this book reveals that over time, Acuitzences have created a comprehensive sense of orientation within a transnational social field. Both locations and the common experience of mobility between them are essential for feeling “at home.” This migrant way of life requires the development of a transnational habitus as well as the skills, statuses, and knowledge required to live in both places. Komarnisky’s work presents a multigenerational and cross-continental understanding of the contemporary transnational experience.

Mexicans in Alaska examines how Acuitzences are living, working, and imagining their futures across North America and suggests that anthropologists look across borders to see how broader structural conditions operate both within and across national boundaries. Understanding the experiences of transnational migrants remains a critical goal of contemporary scholarship, and Komarnisky’s analysis of the complicated lives of three generations of migrants provides depth to the field.

New Book: Contemporary U.S. Latinx Literature in Spanish

 

Here’s a new book for you literature types out there! Edited by Amrita Das, Kathryn Quinn-Sánchez and Michele Shaul…

 

U.S. Latinx Literature in Spanish remains an understudied field despite its large and vibrant corpus. This is partly due to the erroneous impression that this literature is only written in English, and partly due to traditional educational programs focusing on English texts to include non-Spanish speakers and non-Latinx students. This has created a vacuum in research about Latinx literary production in Spanish, leaving the contemporary field wide open for exploration. This volume fills this space by bringing contemporary U.S. Latinx literature in Spanish to the forefront of the field. The essays focus on literary production post-1960 and examine texts by authors from different backgrounds writing from the U.S., providing readers with an opportunity to explore new texts in Spanish within U.S. Latinx literature, and a departure point for starting a meaningful critical discourse about what it means to write and publish in Spanish in the U.S. Through exploring literary production in a language that is both emotionally and politically charged for authors, the academia, and the U.S., this book challenges and enhances our understanding of the term ‘Americas’.